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How Much Does It Cost to Get Rid of Carpet Beetles?

Average range: $225 - $275
Low
$100
Average Cost
$250
High
$300
(moderate infestation in a home larger than 2,000 sq. ft.)

Get free estimates from animal/pest control specialists near you
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How Much Does It Cost to Get Rid of Carpet Beetles?

Average range: $225 - $275
Low
$100
Average Cost
$250
High
$300
(moderate infestation in a home larger than 2,000 sq. ft.)

Get free estimates from animal/pest control specialists near you
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Carpet beetles can wreak havoc on your home, feeding on natural fibers that are in your clothes, bedding, and carpet. They can also lead to allergic reactions when you come into contact with their shed skin.

Since carpet beetles can be hard to spot, their presence can quickly become an infestation before they are detected. If this occurs, a professional exterminator will be needed to eradicate your problem. The national average cost to treat a home for carpet beetles is between $225 and $275, with most homeowners paying around $250 for a moderate infestation in a home larger than 2,000 sq. ft. For mild infestations in homes with 2,000 sq.ft. or less, the cost for treatment will be around $100. If the square footage exceeds 2,000 sq.ft. or you have a severe infestation, the price could go as high as $300.

Carpet Beetle Pest Control Cost

Carpet Beetle Extermination Cost
National Average Cost$250
Average Range$225-$275
Minimum Cost$100
Maximum Cost$300


Updated:

Carpet Beetle Extermination Cost by Project Range

Low
$100
Mild infestation in a home that is 2,000 sq. ft. or less
Average Cost
$250
Moderate infestation in a home larger than 2,000 sq. ft.
High
$300
Severe infestations or homes with other insect or pest problems

Carpet Beetle Extermination Cost by Treatment

While part of any treatment includes keeping your house clean and free of debris that carpet beetles feed on, to rid yourself of an infestation completely, you need to have a professional exterminator perform one of three types of carpet beetle treatments. The three common treatments for carpet beetles and the average cost for each include:


Carpet Beetle Extermination Cost


TypeAverage Cost
Insecticide$180
Pesticide$230
Heat Treatment$250


Carpet Beetle Insecticide

Carpet beetle insecticides are chemical sprays designed to target insects and kill them, their larvae, and their eggs on contact. This type of treatment can also be beneficial if you have other insects in the home, providing a food source for the carpet beetles. When any form of chemical spray is used, you and your pets will need to leave the home for at least a few hours. The length of time depends on the chemicals used and how much of the home is infested. The exterminator will target areas where the bugs and eggs have been found and areas where damage has been detected. The average cost to get rid of carpet beetles using an insecticide is $180.

Carpet Beetle Pesticide

Pesticides are chemical sprays that are designed to kill both pests and insects located in the home. Pesticides may be the best treatment option if you also have rodents or other pests in your home. They kill off both the carpet beetles and other troublesome pests that may attract the carpet beetles into your home. Choosing insecticides or pesticides depends on the professional’s preferences. Like insecticides, you must leave your home for a few hours after treatment. A carpet beetle pesticide treatment usually costs around $230.

Carpet Beetle Heat Treatment

Heat treatment for carpet beetles can be used as a standalone treatment if you wish to avoid chemical intervention or can be used in combination with spray treatments. Heat treatment works by placing a device in the home that raises the home’s temperature to 130 degrees. This temperature is hot enough to effectively kill adult carpet beetles, larvae, and eggs, no matter where they are hiding in your home. When using the heat treatment option, you and your pets need to be out of the home until the treatment is complete and the temperature goes back down to a normal level. Heat treatments are usually around $250.


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Cost of Exterminator for Carpet Beetles

While chemicals can be purchased to spray your home for carpet beetles yourself, they rarely work to eradicate the problem. It is best to hire a professional exterminator with the proper chemicals to kill carpet beetles during all stages 1 of their life cycle. Most carpet beetle infestations require a one-time treatment, which costs between $100 and $300. It is possible to need treatments in the following years if you continue to have conditions that attract carpet beetles, such as rodent or insect problems. The cost for each subsequent treatment depends on the level of infestation when treatment is sought.

Where Do Carpet Beetles Live?

Carpet beetles live in several places around the home, as long as a food source is nearby. They tend to hide, seeking refuge in the darker places in your home. Below are some of the most common places you may find them.

Carpet Beetles in Bedroom

You often find carpet beetles living in the bedroom, primarily hidden in bedding or clothing in the closets. Bedrooms have many items with natural fibers, which are one of their primary sources of food. Carpet beetles are attracted to the smell of sweat, which can soak into sheets and blankets while sleeping during the warmer month. While you may see them on the bed, you will likely identify their presence in closets by damage caused to clothes.

Carpet Beetles in Bathroom

You can find both adult carpet beetles and carpet beetle larvae in the bathroom. Carpet beetles in your bathroom feed on natural hairbrush bristles, towels, or linens, especially those that have been used. Carpet beetles are attracted to the odor of sweat, which may attract them to the bathroom, especially if used towels are left in there.

Carpet Beetles in Carpet

As their name suggests, a popular place to find beetles is in the carpet. Carpets are often made of natural fibers and provide good areas where adults can hide their nests. They tend to be found more towards the edges of carpets and area rugs, keeping away from high-traffic areas.

Carpet Beetles in Kitchen

Carpet beetle larvae in the kitchen are not unusual to find. Many adult carpet beetles may lay their eggs there, especially if grains and spices provide a food source. They can also be found anywhere that dry goods have been spilled and not cleaned up.

Carpet Beetle in Attic

When you find carpet beetles in attic insulation or other parts of the attic, multiple factors have attracted them. First, old clothes or linens offer natural fibers for them to eat. Debris from rodents and dead insects are other primary food sources.

Carpet Beetles in Basement

Carpet beetles in the basement are likely attracted to the same things found in the attic, especially in unfinished basements. When a basement is finished, they may also find the carpet their ideal nesting spot due to the darkness common to most basements. If you store clothing or other fabric items in the basement, they can also be found there, especially if the containers are not well-sealed.

Carpet Beetles in Walls

You may find carpet beetle larvae on walls, especially if you have an abundance of cobwebs or insects. If there are cracks or holes in the walls, they may make their way in there to feed on animal protein and other debris. Carpet beetles can get into the walls from the outside through unsealed cracks and crevices.

Carpet Beetles in Pantry

If you have noticed carpet beetles in your kitchen, there is a chance that they may also be in the pantry. Carpet beetles may search for unsealed spice and grains. They may look for animal debris left from rodents, which may be in the pantry searching for food. Since they prefer dark places near food sources, the corners of the pantry are good hiding places.

Carpet Beetle Infestation by Type

Four primary types of carpet beetles may choose to take up residence inside your home. While the treatment types remain the same no matter which variety you have, it is still important to know what type you have to understand their behavior and what attracts them into your home and keeps them there.

Carpet Beetle Types

Carpet Beetle Types

Common Carpet Beetle

Common carpet beetles are about ⅛” long and have a grayish-black body with orange and white scales on their back. When in the larval stage, they have reddish-brown and black hairs covering them. They feed on animal products, natural fibers, and processed foods.

Black Carpet Beetle Control

Black carpet beetles get their name from their distinctive shiny black body with brownish legs. They can get as long as 5/16” when they are in the adult stage. When in the larval stage, they are stiff, smooth, and short. Their bodies taper toward the rear where they have hair. They feed more on stored grains, cereals, and flours than on fabrics.

Furniture Carpet Beetle Control

Adult furniture carpet beetles are more rounded and mottled with black spots mixed with white and orange scales. They have a white belly. As larvae, they start off white but then darken as they become more mature. They are larger in the front at this stage 1 and narrower in the back. As their name suggests, they prefer to feed on natural fibers, which can be found in different furniture types.

Varied Carpet Beetle Control

Varied carpet beetles get as long as 1/10” and are black. They are most identifiable by the irregular yellow, white, and brown scales on their back. This type of carpet beetle can also be found outdoors, where they feed on webs and bird and bee nests. Indoors they are often found by woolen items, animal skins, and dried plant products. When they are larvae, they will actually be larger than the adults and have dense hair.


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Carpet Beetle Extermination Cost Factors

The treatment for carpet beetles will be higher or lower depending on the level of infestation in the home and the size of the space being treated. Other factors that may alter the costs are other rodent or insect infestations, which may need to be taken care of to remove the carpet beetle's main food source. For example, if you have a home with undisturbed rooms with cobwebs, the infestation could be higher as they will have a steady food source to continue reproducing. Having multiple pets in the home can cause the infestation to be more severe since carpet beetles feed on their hair and dander.

Signs of Carpet Beetle Infestation

Many signs indicate that your home is infested with carpet beetles. When carpet beetles have taken up residence in your bed, they make their home in your sheets, bedding, and mattress. One of the first signs you may notice is red or dark stains on your sheets. They shed their larval skins in the areas where they hide, so you are likely to see these in your bed.

Other carpet beetle infestations signs can be caused by their feeding habits. They like to cause damage to a variety of fabrics around your home, especially clothes made of wool and bedding. A final sign that you may be overrun with carpet beetles is their physical presence. They are larger than bed bugs, so they are often detectable by the naked eye.

Are Carpet Beetles Dangerous?

As with any pests in the home, one of the most likely concerns is how dangerous they are. Carpet beetles will not bite humans as they tend to be scavengers feeding on debris and dead animal products. They also will only feed on dry substances. While they do not bite, they can cause discomfort in humans through carpet beetle rash. This allergic reaction occurs when some people come in contact with the larvae bristles or the shed skin. The most common symptoms include red, watery or itchy eyes, itchy skin, a runny nose, a rash, hives, or stomach issues. Once you get rid of the carpet beetles, your symptoms should diminish and disappear if you are allergic.


Close up of a carpet beetle on a white daisy


All About Carpet Beetles

The carpet beetle’s life cycle involves four primary stages; egg, larvae, pupa, and adult. Females lay between 50 to 100 eggs close to their favorite food sources after finding a warm environment to hide them. They tend to come into homes when the weather is warmer and can often hitch a ride on plants or make their way in through open windows and doors.

Carpet beetles are mostly a nuisance, especially if the infestation is minimal. They will not bite humans. They can be very destructive to household items with natural fibers.

What Do Carpet Beetles Look Like?

When they are adults, carpet beetles are small and difficult to detect with the human eye. They range between 1/16” and ⅛” and have oval-shaped bodies. Their bodies may be black in color or a mottled combination of browns, white, oranges, and yellow. They can sometimes be mistaken for bed bugs due to their appearance and where they are found in the home. They are larger than bed bugs.

What Do Carpet Beetles Eat?

Carpet beetles prey on natural fibers such as wool and leather. This leads them to cause damage to bedding and furniture throughout the home. They feed on dead insects and animal debris, such as pet dander formed from shed pet hair and skin cells.

What Attracts Carpet Beetles?

Many things attract carpet beetles into your home. One is the climate. Carpet beetles prefer warmer temperatures, which often draws them indoors. They are also attracted to animal proteins, making them more tempted to enter the home if you live with pets. And as with many types of pests, they are attracted to dry food particles. While carpet beetles enjoy feeding on carpet, bedding, and clothing, what attracts it most to these items is the odor of sweat.


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Carpet Beetle Damage

Finding carpet beetle holes in clothes may be one of the first signs of a possible infestation. More often than not, carpet beetles are identified by the damage they cause instead of visible confirmation. However, they can sometimes be visible when found in bedding, especially if it is light-colored. When carpet beetles feed in homes, they leave tiny holes in what they eat, reddish-brown stains, and shed skin. These holes can be found in anything in your home that has natural fibers from blankets, to furniture, to pillows. The holes will have a jagged edge and are often mistaken for moth activity.

Where Do Carpet Beetles Lay Eggs?

Adult carpet beetles lay their eggs in the warmer season, usually over two months. Female beetles can nest up to three times in a season, laying 50 to 100 eggs at a time. While carpet beetles can survive outside, the adults will most often lay their eggs inside, where the larvae will be close to needed food sources.

Carpet beetle eggs are small, usually between 1/10” to ⅕”-inch long, with a white or cream color. They are oval-shaped and have a spine-like projection at one end of their bodies. They blend in with their environment, so you will not likely see them until they have reached their larval stage.

You will find carpet beetle nests in dark places close to natural fiber, so the larvae will not have to go far for food. You will find carpet beetle nests in closets, carpets, by air ducts, or close to upholstered furniture. If you find nests in your home, do-it-yourself treatments aren’t likely to irradicate the problem. Instead, rely on the services of a professional exterminator.


Macro shot of a carpet beetle on a flower


How to Prevent Carpet Beetles

The best way to reduce your risk of a carpet beetle infestation is by creating an inhospitable environment. This means keeping areas clean of their main food source and protecting anything in your home that contains natural fibers. Make sure to remove lint from vents around the home and regularly vacuum to keep lint, dander, and hair off the floors. Make sure that all fabrics they would like to prey on are regularly cleaned, using hot water to destroy possible larvae and eggs. Make sure to launder all linens regularly, even ones that are not frequently used. It is also important to keep fibers and fabric clean that are not normally laundered, such as furniture and carpet, which should be regularly steam cleaned.

Another place where carpet beetles may live is in and around unused fireplaces. To prevent an infestation in this area, have your chimney cleaned by a professional once a year. If you store clothes, bedding, or other items with natural fibers, store them properly in cedar-lined closets or chests, or add mothballs to the container.

Since carpet beetles feed on dead animal debris, remove webs and other animal nests inside or around your home, such as bird and wasp nests. You will also want to prevent them from finding ways to get into your home by protecting windows that you open with screens and sealing any outdoor cracks. Carpet beetles are attracted to pollen, so be sure to check for them before bringing any outside plants indoors.

Carpet Beetle vs Bed Bug Extermination Cost

Carpet beetles can often be mistaken for bed bugs due to their similar appearance and penchant for being found in bed and bedding. The main difference between the two in appearance is that carpet beetle larvae has hair, and adult carpet beetles have coloring on their scales. Carpet beetle extermination runs between $100 and $300. Bed bug extermination is a much more extensive process and costs an average of $900 for a treatment. Exterminating carpet beetles is less expensive as their presence can often be found through visual confirmation or through the visible damage they leave behind.


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Additional Considerations and Costs

When it comes to carpet beetle extermination, a few considerations should be taken into account when choosing an extermination method or hiring the right exterminator.

  • DIY. While it is important to follow cleaning protocols to help remove carpet beetles, it is not recommended to exterminate them yourself. DIY chemicals do not always eliminate all carpet beetles. They can continue to multiply and re-infest your home.
  • Cedar oil and mothballs. While adding cedar oil and mothballs to stored bedding and clothing kills some carpet beetles, these items will not repel them and provides little help once an infestation occurs.
  • Carpet beetle deterrent. Keeping your home clean, free of debris, and absent of insects and rodents helps deter carpet beetles from coming into and breeding in your home.
  • Alternative treatments. Many alternative treatments can be used against carpet beetles, though they typically only work for small problems and will not likely get rid an infestation. Carpet beetle traps can help contain them so they can be removed. Carpet beetle diatomaceous earth and boric acid can kill them when you find them.
  • Verify permits and licenses. Before hiring an exterminator to address your carpet beetle problem, make sure that your exterminator is licensed to use the treatments and chemicals needed to eradicate an infestation.
  • Seasonal issues. Adult carpet beetles tend to be more prevalent in spring and summer when the temperatures are warmer. Make sure to watch open doors, cracks, and windows during this time of year since it is the most likely time for them to migrate in to find a place to nest.

FAQs

  • Do you need an exterminator for carpet beetles?

It is always advisable to hire an exterminator to handle a carpet beetle infestation as DIY methods often fail to remove them completely.

  • Can you ever get rid of carpet beetles?

It is possible to get rid of carpet beetles and keep them from coming back by having a professional exterminator treat them and then following preventative measures, such as cleaning and proper storage.

  • How long does it take to get rid of carpet beetles?

If you have a professional treatment, your carpet beetles will be exterminated within 30 minutes, and if you continue protective measures, you should be able to keep them from returning.

  • How does pest control get rid of carpet beetles?

Professionals can use traps and chemicals to get rid of carpet beetle infestations. A heat treatment method that is chemical-free involves heating the entire home to up to 130 degrees. The heat treatment kills them in all stages within 30 minutes.

  • What causes you to get carpet beetles?

Carpet beetles get into your home through cracks, open doors and windows, or by traveling indoors on plants brought in from outside. They stay in the home and repopulate if they have ample food and are left undisturbed. This means if your home has many areas that aren’t regularly vacuumed, swept, or dusted, you may have a greater chance of an infestation.

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Cost to exterminate carpet beetles varies greatly by region (and even by zip code). To get free estimates from local contractors, please indicate yours.

Updated:
The information provided by our cost guides comes from a great variety of sources, including specialized publications and websites, cost studies, U.S. associations, reports from the U.S. government, contractors and subcontractors, material suppliers, material price services, and other vendor websites. For more information, read our Methodology and sources.
Carpet beetle on a white daisy
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Cost to exterminate carpet beetles varies greatly by region (and even by zip code). To get free estimates from local contractors, please indicate yours.

The information provided by our cost guides comes from a great variety of sources, including specialized publications and websites, cost studies, U.S. associations, reports from the U.S. government, contractors and subcontractors, material suppliers, material price services, and other vendor websites. For more information, read our Methodology and sources.