How Much Does a Gable Roof Cost?

Average range: $7,000 - $20,000
Low
$4,750
Average Cost
$9,000
High
$45,000
(Installing standard architectural shingles on a 1,500 sq.ft. gable roof)

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Reviewed by Isabel Maria Perez. Written by Fixr.com.

Gable roofs are one of the most common roof types found on U.S. homes. You can find gable roofs on many architecture types, ranging from ranches to colonials. A gable can be built using rafters or trusses, meaning it is suitable for many housing styles, including those with open floor plans. It is easy to install roofing materials on gable roofs because they typically have moderate pitches. They can also use nearly any roofing material available, from asphalt shingles to metal and slate.

The national average cost to install new roofing on an existing gable roof is $7,000 to $20,000, with most people paying around $9,000 to install 1,500 sq.ft. of standard architectural shingles on a gable roof. This project’s low cost is $4,750 for installing 3-tab asphalt shingles on a 1,500 sq.ft. gable roof. The high cost is $45,000 for an installed 1,500 sq.ft. natural slate cross gable roof.

What Is a Gable Roof?

A gable roof is one of the most common roofing styles in the U.S. It extends to the front and back of the home from a single peak in the center. In a way, the side view of a gable roof makes the home appear like a triangle. It does not extend over the sides of the home. It can be built using rafters or trusses 1, depending on the construction style. Many homes use gable roofs, and they can have a wide range of pitches. The most common pitch is 4/12 to 9/12, meaning that the pitch moves 4º to 9º for every 12” in height. It is possible to have a pitch of 18/12 or higher for some A-frame homes with gable roofs.

Gable Roof Cost Calculator

Gable roofs can be covered in any material. Because this is the most simple roof design, it is one of the least expensive roof types to cover. If you have a home with cross gables or multiple sections of gable roofing, you may have higher costs. Different material types can impact the cost, both for the labor and material. Below are the average costs to roof a standard 1,500 sq.ft. gable roof.


Gable Roof Costs
Zip Code Sq.Ft.
Basic Standard Best Quality
Gable Roof Cost (Material Only) $2,000 - $3,000 $3,125 - $7,500 $7,500 - $35,000
Gable Roof Installation Cost (Labor Only) $2,500 - $3,750 $4,000 - $7,500 $7,500 - $10,000
Total Costs $4,500 - $6,750 $7,125 - $15,000 $15,000 - $45,000
Gable Roof Cost per Sq.Ft. $3.00 - $4.50 $4.75 - $10.00 $10.00 - $30.00


Gable roofs are very common and can accommodate many materials. The most common roofing materials for this type include asphalt 2 shingles 3, architectural shingles, metal roofing, and slate shingles. Asphalt shingles are the least expensive, with architectural shingles and some metal types being the moderate choices. Other metals like copper and materials like slate are the best-quality and most-expensive materials used for gable roofs.

Cost of Converting a Hip Roof to a Gable

If you have a hip roof, your roof extends equally out on all four sides. A gable roof extends outward on only two sides. To convert a hip roof to a gable roof, you must remove a good deal of roofing. Unfortunately, this cannot be done on its own. You need an entirely new roof, with the trusses or rafters removed completely and rebuilt in the gable style. For a 2,000 sq.ft. roof, you will lose some overall size, with the resulting gable roof coming in closer to 1,500 sq.ft, as hip roofs require more material. The cost for this ranges between $20,000 and $30,000 just for the framing. You then need to cover the roof with a roofing material, adding another $6,000 to $30,000 to the project, depending on the material.

Gable Roof Extension Cost

When building an extension onto the side of your home, you also need to extend your roof. This can be done in a few ways. You can build an entirely new roof - either a similar gable or a cross gable moving the other way - or you can try to match and extend the existing roof. The latter means modifying the existing roof. Adding a cross gable will be less costly. For a 200 sq.ft. addition, expect to pay between $2,000 and $4,000 for a new cross gable and $3,000 to $6,000 for an extension of the existing roof frame. In addition, you will pay between $1,500 and $5,000 to add a new roofing material to the new section. If you cannot match the color or material of your existing roof exactly, you need to reroof it entirely.


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Additional Considerations and Costs

  • Lifespan. The lifespan of a gable roof depends on the material used to cover it. The frame will last hundreds of years, while the material could last 20 to 200 years.
  • Maintenance. Maintenance varies depending on the material. This can include yearly inspections and periodic cleaning.
  • Flashing. All roofs should be flashed around protrusions, including chimneys, vents, and skylights. The cost to install flashing 4 is $10 to $25 a linear foot.
  • Roof deck. Above the roof frame but below the roofing material is the roof deck. This is installed with a new roof and may need to be occasionally reinforced or replaced with the roofing material. Costs average $800 to $2,800 for a new roof deck.

FAQs

  • How much does a gable roof cost?

The average cost range to install roofing on a gable roof is $7,000 to $20,000, with most people paying around $9,000 for 1,500 sq.ft. of architectural shingles.

  • Can you add a gable to an existing roof?

Yes, homes can have multiple gables. Sometimes, you will see two gables moving in different directions, known as a cross gable. Typically, each section of the home or structure has its own gable, which together make up the roof.

  • What is the purpose of a gable roof?

Gable roofs are fast and easy to build. The purpose is to create a pitch that can help snow and rain slide easily off the home. Inside will be an attic with a high center beam and lower slopes to the front and back.

  • What is the difference between a gable roof and a hip roof?

The main difference is the number of “sides” to the roof. A gable roof has two sides, while a hip roof has four. A gable roof resembles a triangle from the side, while a hip roof extends equally out to all four sides of the home.

  • Where are gable roofs most common geographically?

Gable roofs are very common in the Northeast, Midwest, and Northwest, but they can be found anywhere. This is one of the simplest and easiest roof types to build, so they are common in new construction.

Remodeling Terms Cheat Sheet

Definitions in laymen's terms, cost considerations, pictures and things you need to know.
See full cheat sheet.
glossary term picture Truss 1 Trusses: Structural framework used to support a roof
glossary term picture Bitumen 2 Asphalt: A viscous, black mixture of hydrocarbons often used for roofing and waterproofing. It is also used in asphalt for paving roads
glossary term picture Shingle 3 Shingles: A smooth, uniform, flat piece of construction material, available in a wide variety of materials and laid in a series of overlapping rows, used to cover the outside of roofs or walls to protect against weather damage and leaks.
glossary term picture Flashing 4 Flashing: Pieces of sheet metal used on roofs to cover joints, such as where the roof meets the wall, or around a chimney or skylight, to protect them and prevent water leaking through

Cost to install a gable roof varies greatly by region (and even by zip code). To get free estimates from local contractors, please indicate yours.

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The information provided by our cost guides comes from a great variety of sources, including specialized publications and websites, cost studies, U.S. associations, reports from the U.S. government, contractors and subcontractors, material suppliers, material price services, and other vendor websites. For more information, read our Methodology and sources