Lay Stamped Concrete Patio Cost

In this guide

The process
Itemized
Cost per sq.ft.
Enhancements
Additional Considerations

How much does it cost to lay a stamped concrete patio?

Laying a stamped concrete patio is a great way to make your backyard more attractive and add extra leisure space. Stamped concrete is made to look like many other paver materials, such as natural stone, ashlar, granite, or brick. It is an affordable alternative to using these sometimes expensive materials, and looks very realistic. Stamped concrete is more stable than pavers since it’s one solid mass rather than multiple bricks or stones, and that enables you to create a smooth, continuous surface.

Many homeowners choose to add stamped concrete to their properties because they can easily add recoupable value. The price you are charged for your stamped concrete patio project is dependent on factors like labor needs, concrete patterns, and detailing. This cost guide will determine the average cost of laying a stamped concrete patio of 16’ x 18’ (288 sq. ft.).

The process

Stamped concrete is made as it sounds: through stamping. While the concrete is wet, stamps with particular patterns are pressed onto the surface, creating a textured look. Popular styles are herringbone, flagstone 1 and cobblestone 2. It is usually then dyed in colors most suitable to achieve your desired appearance.

There are some pros and cons regarding stamped concrete patios, which are:

ProsCons

Less expensive than pavers

Add visual appeal

Add value to property

Easy to clean

No cracks for weeds to grow through

Long installation process

Need routine maintenance

Low adaptability


It usually takes 32-36 hours to complete the installation process for a patio of 16’ x 18’ (288 sq. ft.). That’s 4 to 4 ½ total working days.

Cost breakdown

Contractors will either serve you an itemized bill, or one based on cost per square foot. Which one your contractor chooses largely depends on their preference, but typically, you can expect that smaller projects will get itemization.

Itemized

  • Materials: All materials needed include reinforced 3500 PSI concrete, stamps and texturizing tools, waste overage, delivery fees, chemicals, and reinforcement and isolation materials. You’ll need at least 3.5 cubic yards of concrete. Cost: $900-$1,000
  • Labor: Contractors usually charge $35-$85 per hour. Labor typically includes: soil grading 3 and compacting; setting concrete forms; and pouring, finishing and patterning the concrete. The average work time on this project would be 32-36 hours. Cost: $1,120-$3,060
  • Excavation: If your land needs excavation or significant grading 3 prior to building the patio, expect total costs to increase by 50%.

Cost per sq.ft.

  • Basic: Stamped concrete installation with one simple pattern (ex: herringbone or ashlar) and one color. Cost: $8-$12 per sq.ft. Total: $2,304-$3,456 for 16’ x 18’ (288 sq. ft.).
  • Mid-range: Customize stamped concrete plus borders, or a second pattern or color. Cost: $12-$18 per sq.ft. Total: $2,304-$5,184 for 16’ x 18’ (288 sq. ft.).
  • High-end: Highly detailed stamped concrete including multiple patterns and colors. Can include specialty patterns and hand-coloring made to mimic natural stone color variations. Cost: $18+ per sq.ft. Total: $5,184+ for 16’ x 18’ (288 sq. ft.).

Enhancement and improvement costs

Paint

Painting and sealing stamped concrete can give it even more visual appeal. The average cost of this is $0.70-$0.86 per sq. ft. ($200-$250 for 16’ x 18’ [288 sq. ft.]).

Hand-detailing

Using detailing tools in addition to the basic stamps can add richness to your patio’s appearance. Detailing is done while the concrete is still wet so that custom patterns and textures can be easily carved. This typically costs $225.

Additional considerations and costs

Old patios

If you have an old patio that needs to go before the new one can be built, you’ll need to hire a removal and disposal service. The average cost of this is $125-$250. Keep in mind that if your old patio’s concrete is in good condition, you can lay the new stamped concrete over it.

DIY

Experts don’t recommend DIY installations. Laying stamped concrete is a meticulous, time-consuming process that involves many steps that must be completed within short windows of time. This requires a high degree of skill and preparation that usually only professionals possess. Also, equipment necessary for installation is very expensive. You’d have to spend hundreds of dollars on tools you’d likely only use once.

Durability and maintenance

Stamped concrete patios can last for decades. They will inevitably develop cracks over time because they are solid platforms on a gradually-shifting surface (the ground). However, they have high durability and are very resistant to cracking when installed properly. Regular maintenance is needed to keep cracks and other damage at bay. You’ll need to apply a sealant every 2 years or so to protect your patio ($25-$30 per gallon).

Safety

Since stamped concrete patios can be slippery when wet, they’re not recommended for properties rainy climates. During the rainy season in your area, we suggest applying an anti-skid formula to your patio ($30 per gallon).

Resale value

Because stamped concrete patios last a long time, are highly attractive, and provide outdoor leisure space, they easily add to your home’s resale value. You can expect a high return on investment.

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Remodeling Terms Cheat Sheet

Definitions in laymen's terms, cost considerations, pictures and things you need to know.
See full cheat sheet.
1 Flagstone: A piece of rock, usually sedimentary, that has been split into layers. It is commonly used for paving and walkways, and is also used for fences and roofing
2 Cobblestone: Smooth, flat stones set closely together with sand or mortar to hold them in place. They are used for paving
3 Grading: The process of evening out the ground's surface, making it either flat or sloped.

Cost to lay a stamped concrete patio varies greatly by region (and even by zipcode). To get free estimates from local contractors, please indicate yours.

Labor cost by city and zipcode

Compared to national average
Arlington, TX
+6%
Athens, OH
-32%
Austin, TX
+13%
Baltimore, MD
+12%
Baton Rouge, LA
+19%
Bedford, TX
+5%
Birmingham, AL
+6%
Boston, MA
+40%
Brewster, MA
+5%
Brewton, AL
-40%
Brooklyn, NY
+16%
Brunswick, OH
-8%
Burbank, CA
+12%
Burnsville, MN
+16%
Caledonia, MI
+5%
Carencro, LA
+14%
Charlotte, NC
+6%
Chicago, IL
+40%
Cincinnati, OH
+6%
Columbus, OH
+5%
Coventry, RI
+5%
Cupertino, CA
+33%
Cypress, TX
+8%
Denton, TX
+17%
Denver, CO
+1%
Detroit, MI
+16%
Folsom, CA
+6%
Fort Myers, FL
-7%
Fort Worth, TX
+6%
Fremont, CA
+35%
Frisco, TX
+23%
Harlingen, TX
-33%
Hartford, WI
-5%
Hayward, CA
+31%
Hialeah, FL
-2%
Hillsboro, OR
+15%
Hollywood, FL
0%
Houston, TX
+24%
Humble, TX
+16%
Indianapolis, IN
+6%
Inkster, MI
+16%
Jackson, TN
+1%
Kansas City, KS
+16%
Katy, TX
+63%
Lafayette, IN
-10%
Las Vegas, NV
+7%
Lee, FL
-60%
Livonia, MI
+16%
Los Angeles, CA
+11%
Los Osos, CA
+1%

Labor cost in your zipcode

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Methodology and sources