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TV Repair Cost

The average cost of repairing a TV is around $135.

In this guide

Cost considerations
Common problems
Labor
Replacing vs repairing a television
Additional considerations and costs
FAQ

How much does it cost to repair a TV?

The average American spends more than four hours each day watching television. This naturally means that encountering problems with your set can disrupt your normal routine. When your TV quits working, you’ll want to find a reliable repair solution as quickly as possible.

Common television repairs involve problems with the picture, sound quality, or a broken screen. The average cost of fixing the most common types of TV issues can be between $40 and $260.

Cost considerations

Older televisions such as analog sets, as well as LED TVs are more expensive to repair. Parts for these are harder to come by, which adds to their price. In addition, parts for models that are 42” or above are more costly, thereby adding to the price of repairs.

An LCD TV can last between 30,000 and 60,000 hours. Even so, the picture quality will start to deteriorate after only a few years. This means that even if you repair your set, you may not be able to fully enjoy it if it is already more than five years old. In many cases, the money you spent to purchase your original model may easily buy you a bigger, higher definition TV.

Common problems

The chart below details some of the most common problems with LED, OLED, LCD, and plasma television sets, as well as suggested solutions. Costs are listed next to the problem for easy reference.

Type of problem and costRecommended solutionPrice
Damaged connectors or cablesRepair or replace connectors or cables$10-$135
Television will not turn onChange out the fuse in the power supply or replace the power supply$40-$150
Vertical or horizontal lines in the screenReplace the t-con board$40-$135
Image shows up momentarily and then the screen goes blankReplace the backlight inverter$60-$110
Sound is not workingInstall a new main board$60-$260
Screen is cracked or brokenReplace screen$82-$260


Labor

At the first sign of trouble, you may be tempted to take your set apart and try to fix it yourself. However, you should avoid doing so because it could void your warranty. Not only that, but modern televisions are highly technical, and contain components that the average person is likely not familiar with.

A television repair technician has earned a career certificate or Associate’s degree in electronics technology or a related field. You can expect to pay between $40 and $60 per hour in labor for someone to fix your television.

The amount of time it takes to repair your TV will depend on what the problem is and the availability of parts. Most jobs can be completed in one to three hours when parts are on hand.

Most technicians will charge you a diagnostic fee up front. This fee is for determining what the problem is and can run between $75 and $100. The cost is often waived if you allow the shop’s technicians to make repairs for you.

Replacing vs repairing a television

Consumer Reports recommends replacing electronics whenever the cost of repairs equals or exceeds half the cost of a new purchase. You might also want to replace your set if a similar one is less than $200, or if your screen is under 32”. For example, it would cost around $148 for a new mainboard in an LG Model 24LF452B 24” TV, which would take around one hour to repair. As a result, you could pay anywhere from $188 to $208 to repair your set, as opposed to spending around $120 for a brand new model.

On occasion, a television’s screen will burn out or become discolored. When that happens, using the built-in pixel shift software or refreshing the screen will sometimes resolve the issue. If these self-help methods are ineffective, you will need to replace your set.

When a television is nearing the end of its lifespan, it may require more frequent repairs. If yours has required more than two or three repairs within a twelve-month period, it could be time for a replacement.

Additional considerations and costs

  • In some cases, television repair can be performed as a DIY project. There are numerous “how to” videos available that are easy to watch and understand. Parts for most sets are also available online. However, many people scrap old television sets for parts and then sell them on the internet so there is often no guarantee as to whether or not a used part will work.
  • While DIY repair is often possible, it is not recommended in every case. There is some risk of electrocution unless you unplug your set and completely disconnect its power supply. You might also incur more damage by improperly installing a t-con board or ribbon connectors. If you are in doubt, it is best to leave this job to a professional.
  • Before seeking repairs, you should first look for the obvious. For example, if your set will not power on it could be a problem with your outlet and not your TV’s power supply. Try plugging your television into a different outlet to see if that resolves the problem. If that does not fix your problem, ensure you have not tripped a breaker and that the power cord is fully seated.
  • For problems with sound, check your HDMI or audio cables to see that they are connected properly and securely fastened on both ends. If everything looks good, you can try switching out the cables to see if that helps. When you are hearing sound but notice a delay, changing the speaker settings will often eliminate the problem.
  • A set that powers on and off at random is sometimes caused by issues with the remote. Try removing and replacing the batteries or using a different remote if one is available.
  • When purchasing a new television, buying an extended warranty can spare you the unwanted expense of repair bills. An extended warranty is largely based on the price of your television. You can expect to spend between 10 and 20 percent of your set’s cost on an extended warranty. Ordinary warranties only cover manufacturer’s defects, and therefore cannot be used to pay for damage due to neglect or accidents.
  • If you are having warranty repairs made, try to drop the set off at a local shop whenever possible. If you need to ship the television off, be sure to get a tracking number so you can easily locate your set should it become lost.
  • Television repair scams are quite common in this industry. Before hiring someone to fix your set, find out what type of experience and training that person has. Be sure to check references and online reviews as well.

FAQ

  • How much does it cost to repair a TV?

Television repair costs can vary widely, but the average consumer will pay somewhere between $40 and $260. Prices depend on the make, model, and size of your set, as well as the availability of parts. It is generally more expensive to repair an older model than it would be to replace it. New televisions are becoming more affordable every year, but the price of parts may remain steady or even increase.

  • Can a flat screen TV be fixed?

It is possible to repair a flat screen television with only superficial cracks, black spots, or vertical lines so long as they have not penetrated the LED or plasma.

  • How do you fix a broken TV screen?

Remove all external cables, unplug your set, and lay it face down on a flat, soft surface. Remove any screws that are holding the frame in place and then gently remove the frame and set it aside. Put your new screen in place and reconnect the internal cables in the same manner in which you first disconnected them.

  • How much does a flat screen cost?

A new flat screen television starts at around $99 for models with a 32” screen or less. A set measuring approximately 40 inches will run you between $150 and $400. You could pay as much as $7,000 for a model with a 77” screen or larger. In addition to screen size, the price of a new television is based on the type of TV, its features, and manufacturer quality.

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Cost repair a TV varies greatly by region (and even by zip code). To get free estimates from local contractors, please indicate yours.

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Labor cost by city and zip code

Compared to national average
Alexandria, VA
+2%
Alvarado, TX
-22%
Athens, GA
-9%
Atlanta, GA
+24%
Austin, TX
+13%
Baltimore, MD
+12%
Birmingham, AL
+6%
Bronx, NY
+32%
Brooklyn, NY
+16%
Carrollton, TX
+14%
Charlotte, NC
+6%
Chicago, IL
+40%
Colorado Springs, CO
-3%
Columbus, OH
+5%
Dallas, TX
+10%
Denver, CO
+1%
Detroit, MI
+16%
Durham, NH
+5%
El Paso, TX
-28%
Fort Lauderdale, FL
+2%
Henrico, VA
+6%
Houston, TX
+24%
Jacksonville, FL
-1%
Las Vegas, NV
+7%
Lithonia, GA
+9%
Los Angeles, CA
+11%
Louisville, KY
-7%
Menifee, CA
-6%
Mesa, AZ
-2%
Mesquite, TX
+7%
Miami, FL
+1%
Milpitas, CA
+33%
Milwaukee, WI
+12%
Minneapolis, MN
+25%
New York, NY
+77%
Newark, OH
-21%
North Las Vegas, NV
+7%
Oakland, CA
+36%
Omaha, NE
-10%
Philadelphia, PA
+40%
Rochester, NY
+6%
Sacramento, CA
+8%
Saint Louis, MO
+16%
San Diego, CA
+11%
San Marcos, TX
-14%
Seattle, WA
+9%
Sherman, TX
-24%
Smyrna, GA
+10%
Tampa, FL
-2%
Toledo, OH
+9%
Labor cost in your zip code
Last modified:   
Methodology and sources