How Much Does it Cost to Install Vinyl Siding?

Average range: $7,500 - $12,000
Low
$4,500
Average Cost
$9,000
High
$22,500
(1,500 sq.ft. of vinyl siding in a mixture of lap and shingle-look planks, installed)

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How Much Does it Cost to Install Vinyl Siding?

Average range: $7,500 - $12,000
Low
$4,500
Average Cost
$9,000
High
$22,500
(1,500 sq.ft. of vinyl siding in a mixture of lap and shingle-look planks, installed)

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Reviewed by Isabel Maria Perez. Written by Fixr.com.

First created in the 1950s as a lower-maintenance alternative to wood, vinyl siding is one of the most frequently installed types of siding. Vinyl is a type of plastic, polyvinyl chloride, that has the color impregnated completely through each piece. Unlike wood, this means that it does not need to be painted to maintain its color and appearance. Vinyl siding comes in a wide range of different styles and colors and mimics many types of materials and styles. Therefore, there is a wide range of costs associated with its installation.

The national average range for installing vinyl siding is between $7,500 and $12,000, with most homeowners spending around $9,000 to install 1,500 sq.ft. of vinyl siding in a mixture of lap siding and shingle-look planks. The low cost for this project is around $4,500 for 1,500 sq.ft. of thin vinyl planks installed, while the high cost is around $22,500 for 1,500 sq.ft. of insulated vinyl siding installed in a mixture of lap siding, faux-stone, and shingle-look.

Vinyl Siding Prices

Vinyl Siding Installation Costs
National average cost$9,000
Average range$7,500-$12,000
Minimum cost$4,500
Maximum cost$22,500


Vinyl Siding Installation Cost by Project Range

Low
$4,500
1,500 sq.ft. of thin vinyl lap siding, installed
Average Cost
$9,000
1,500 sq.ft. of vinyl siding in a mixture of lap and shingle-look planks, installed
High
$22,500
1,500 sq.ft. of insulated vinyl siding in a mixture of lap, faux-stone, and shingle-look style, installed

Vinyl Siding Cost per Square Foot of Siding

Vinyl 1 siding is both sold and installed by the square foot. This costs between $1.30 and $10 for the material, and an additional $1 to $3 in costs for installation, making the total cost range for vinyl siding between $2.30 and $13 a square foot. For example, the vinyl siding cost for 1,200 sq.ft. ranges from $1,560 to $12,000 for the material and $1,200 to $3,600 for installation, for a total range of $2,760 to $15,600, including all materials and labor costs. The large discrepancy in the cost to vinyl side a house is due to the many different types and styles of vinyl, which have greatly varying costs:


Cost to Install 500 Sq.Ft., 1000 Sq.Ft., 1500 Sq.Ft., 2000 Sq.Ft., and 2500 Sq.Ft. of Vinyl Siding

Cost to Install 500 Sq.Ft., 1000 Sq.Ft., 1500 Sq.Ft., 2000 Sq.Ft., and 2500 Sq.Ft. of Vinyl Siding


Square FeetAverage Cost Range (Installed)
500 sq.ft.$1,150 - $6,500
1,000 sq.ft.$2,300 - $13,000
1,500 sq.ft.$3,450 - $19,500
2,000 sq.ft.$4,600 - $26,000
2,500 sq.ft.$5,750 - $32,500


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Cost to Vinyl Side a House by Home Size

When it comes to installing vinyl siding, it is crucial to know the size of your home as a whole. Plus, many homeowners do not know exactly how many square feet of siding they need while being well aware of the square footage of their home. For an average one-story house, you can expect to pay between $3,000 and $28,600, depending on the overall square footage. Let’s take a closer look at the price ranges for some common house sizes, so you can start planning your project on the right foot.


Cost to Install Vinyl Siding in a 1000, 1500, 2000, 2500, and 3000 Sq.Ft. House

Cost to Install Vinyl Siding in a 1000, 1500, 2000, 2500, and 3000 Sq.Ft. House


Square Feet of HomeAverage Cost Range (Installed)
1,000 sq.ft.$3,000 - $16,500
1,500 sq.ft.$3,500 - $20,100
2,000 sq.ft.$4,100 - $23,400
2,500 sq.ft.$4,600 - $26,000
3,000 sq.ft.$5,700 - $28,600


Cost to Vinyl Side a 1,000 Sq.Ft. House

The average cost to install vinyl siding on a 1,000 square foot house ranges from $3,000 to $16,500. A house this size will typically have two to three bedrooms and one and a half bathrooms. Since a house this size is usually on the smaller side, it will only be one story. This will make the overall cost of your siding project less expensive overall.

Vinyl Siding Cost for 1,500 Sq.Ft.

On average, it costs between $3,500 to $20,100 to install vinyl siding on a 1,500 square foot house with one story. A house this size will typically have two or three bedrooms, one or two full bathrooms, and usually a combined kitchen-dining room space. When it comes to measuring your siding, your contractor will work around your windows and doors, so the overall cost will depend on how many you have.

Cost of Vinyl Siding for a 2,000 Sq.Ft. House

If you’re installing vinyl siding on a 2,000 square foot house, you can expect to pay between $4,100 and $23,400. Overall costs vary depending on the number and layout of the windows, gables, and doors. A house this size will normally have three to four bedrooms, two to two and a half bathrooms, a full kitchen, dining room, and main living room.

Vinyl Siding Cost for a 2,500 Sq.Ft. House

It costs between $4,600 to $26,000 on average to install vinyl siding on a 2,500 square foot home. A space this size will generally have three to four bedrooms and two to three bathrooms. It will also have a larger kitchen, dining room, and living room.

Cost of Vinyl Siding for a 3,000 Sq.Ft. House

You can expect to pay between $5,700 and $28,600 to install vinyl siding on a 3,000 square foot house with one story. A house this size will generally have at least four bedrooms, larger kitchens and living spaces, and two to four bathrooms. One of the benefits of a house this size is all the extra elbow 2 room. On the other side, this will make your siding installation project more expensive.

Vinyl Siding Cost per Square

When installing siding, one common unit of measurement used for materials is a square of siding. This amount of siding covers 100 square feet of wall space, which would be a 10-by-10 section of an exterior wall. To calculate the squares of siding material needed, you should first figure out the wall area in square feet and subtract the square footage of any exterior doors and windows. Then, divide that number by 100. When it comes time to order siding, your contractor will probably order a bit over that amount to account for any waste. On average, a square of vinyl siding costs between $130 and $1,000 for materials alone.

Vinyl Siding Cost per Box

Another unit of measurement you will often see is a box of siding. A box will contain two squares of siding and generally cost between $260 and $2,000. Therefore, it can cover up to 200 square feet of an exterior wall. When measuring for your siding installation project, be sure to take your windows, doors, and other areas of waste into consideration, as you won’t need siding for those areas.

New Vinyl Siding Cost by Width

Depending on the type and style of vinyl siding and the manufacturer, it is measured in a few different ways. Most vinyl siding is sold in groups of profiles. While wood siding is installed one piece at a time, vinyl goes up two, three, or four rows at a time, all joined together making up a profile.

Most lap or horizontal siding has a profile width of 4 inches, with some having 5-inch profiles. Sometimes, a section or group of rows have an overall width of 6 or 7 inches. The profiles may only be 3-inches wide, but the total section width is used in the description.

Shingles, shakes, and faux brick and stone made of vinyl will also be sold in large sections or panels that may measure 12 inches in width, but each profile may only measure 2 to 6 inches, depending on the style. Because of these variations in how the vinyl is made and categorized, there can often be a lot of overlap in costs. The width of your siding will not have much, if any, impact on the project cost. The style and type of vinyl you choose typically matters more.


Cost per Square Foot of a 4, 5, 6, 7, and 12-Inch Vinyl Siding

Cost per Square Foot of a 4, 5, 6, 7, and 12-Inch Vinyl Siding


Siding WidthTypical StylesAverage Costs per Square Foot(Material Only)
4 InchesHorizontal lap, faux brick$1.30 - $10
5 InchesHorizontal lap$1.30 - $10
6 InchesShingle, shake, faux stone$2.50 - $10
7 InchesShingle, shake, faux stone, log-look$2.50 - $10
12 InchesBoard and batten, faux stone$2.50 - $10


Talk to local pros to get quotes for your vinyl siding installation project

Average Cost of Vinyl Siding by Type

In addition to different styles and widths, vinyl siding is available in various types. Traditionally, vinyl siding was always hollow with nothing inside or behind the thin plastic of the planks. It is still available that way, but it is also sold in insulated versions, as well as thicker premium materials that are more durable than the original thinner plastic. Each material has a range of costs:


Cost per Square Foot of Hollow, Premium, and Insulated Vinyl Siding

Cost per Square Foot of Hollow, Premium, and Insulated Vinyl Siding


Vinyl Siding TypeAverage Costs per Square Foot (Material Only)
Hollow$1.30 - $4
Premium$2.50 - $8
Insulated$8 - $10


Hollow Vinyl Siding Prices

Hollow vinyl siding is the least expensive at $1.30 to $4 a square foot. This is a thin plastic siding, about 0.035 inches thick. You can install this siding over rigid foam insulation or simply over house wrap. This vinyl siding can be used as a rain screen in high rainfall areas because there is nothing behind it, and there is a cavity between it and the wall. Hollow vinyl siding is usually seen as the least durable, but it is also one of the most common types.

Premium Hollow Vinyl Siding Prices

Premium vinyl siding costs between $2.50 and $8 a square foot on average. This is a slightly heavier vinyl, ranging from 0.04 to 0.05 inches in thickness. This makes it more durable than standard hollow vinyl siding. Premium vinyl is less likely to crack in cold climates than the thinner hollow material. It can be installed over rigid foam insulation or house wrap. It also acts as a rain screen in heavy rainfall areas.

Insulated Vinyl Siding Costs

Insulated vinyl siding is the most costly at $8 to $10 a square foot. This premium vinyl has rigid foam insulation already attached to the back of the planks or panels. The insulation fits tightly to the vinyl and is more effective than applying insulation to the walls. This type of vinyl cannot operate as a rain screen, but it is a better choice for colder climates than standard hollow vinyl siding. Because vinyl on its own is not a good insulator, it is recommended that some type of insulation be used with it to improve the energy efficiency of the home and create a tighter building envelope.

Average Cost of Vinyl Siding by Style

One of the most versatile aspects of vinyl siding is how it can be formed in many different ways. Siding is created with molds so that it can mimic the look of wood lap, brick, and stone siding, as well as shingles 3, shakes 4, and even log-look. The vinyl style is one of the biggest driving factors behind its cost:


Cost per Square Foot of Vinyl Siding by Style: Traditional Lap, Smooth, Beaded, Dutch Lap, Board and Batten, Shake, Log-Look

Cost per Square Foot of Vinyl Siding by Style: Traditional Lap, Smooth, Beaded, Dutch Lap, Board and Batten, Shake, Log-Look


Vinyl Siding StyleAverage Cost per Square Foot (Material Only)
Traditional Lap$1.30 - $6
Smooth$1.30 - $6
Beaded$1.30 - $6
Dutch Lap$1.30 - $6
Clapboard$1.30 - $6
Board and Batten$2.50 - $8
Vinyl Shake$2.50 - $8
Scalloped$3 - $8
Log-Look$4 - $10
Brick-Look$4 - $10
Stone-Look$4 - $10


Traditional Lap Vinyl Siding Prices

Traditional lap vinyl siding is one of many types of horizontal lap siding and costs between $1.30 and $6 a square foot, depending on the type. Traditional lap looks like clapboard from a distance. It is made to be thicker at the bottom of each plank, so the different planks form wedges. There is usually little to no decorative elements to this type of siding. The overall sections can be up to 6 inches wide, but generally, the planks themselves are 3 to 4 inches in thickness.

Smooth Vinyl Siding

Smooth vinyl siding is usually sold as a type of lap siding and ranges from $1.30 to $6 a foot like most other laps. A lap siding is any type of horizontal siding where the top plank overlaps the one below. Smooth lap means that there is no wood grain texture to the planks. This option is purely aesthetic and does not influence the quality or performance of the siding. Some people find smooth vinyl to be slightly easier to clean and maintain than textured, but apart from that, there is little difference between them. Like most lap sidings, smooth lap is usually found in 4 to 5-inch widths.

Beaded Vinyl Siding Cost

Beaded vinyl siding is another type of horizontal lap siding, costing between $1.30 and $6 a square foot on average. The bead in this siding is an indent along the bottom of each lap. This creates a lip with a deep shadow that adds visual interest to the planks. The shadow helps break up the siding slightly, giving it a more interesting appearance. Beaded siding is not as common as other types of lap siding, so your color options may be limited. Like other lap sidings, it is typically 4 to 5 inches in width.

Dutch Lap Vinyl Siding Cost

Dutch lap vinyl siding costs between $1.30 and $6 a square foot, depending on the type. Dutch lap siding is arguably one of the most popular siding styles in the U.S. This is a type of horizontal siding that has a concave upper section on the lap. The section of the plank above the lapping over the concave area casts a deep shadow onto the plank below. This makes the siding more interesting without needing any additional decorative elements. Dutch lap siding is usually between 4 and 5-inches thick and comes in both hollow and insulated types.

Clapboard Vinyl Siding Prices

Clapboard vinyl siding ranges from $1.30 to $6 a square foot, depending on the type. Clapboard is one of the oldest types of plank siding used in the U.S. Therefore, many people think that any horizontal lap siding is clapboard, but it is a distinct type. Each plank is thicker at the bottom than at the top, creating a wedge. Clapboard vinyl siding comes in many colors, as well as in smooth and wood grain finishes. It can be hollow or insulated.

Board and Batten Vinyl Siding Cost

Board and batten siding made of vinyl is $2.50 to $8 a square foot on average. Board and batten is one of the oldest siding styles known in the U.S. It was first made of large boards about 12 inches wide installed vertically over the home. Thin strips called battens were fastened over the seams. Vinyl board and batten is usually made of 12-inch panels with the battens already attached, overlapping two boards. This type of vinyl is slightly less common, so colors and thicknesses may be limited.

Vinyl Shake Siding Cost

Vinyl shake cost per square foot ranges from $2.50 to $8. Vinyl shake siding is lightweight, low-maintenance, and attractive, making it a great option for any home. You can choose from two types: cedar shake and hand-split shake 5. Let’s take a closer look at each to figure out which type works best for your space.


Cost per Square Foot of Cedar-Look and Hand Split Vinyl Shake Siding

Cost per Square Foot of Cedar-Look and Hand Split Vinyl Shake Siding


Type of Vinyl ShakeCost per Square Foot
Cedar-Look Shake$2.50 - $8
Hand-Split Shake$2.50 - $8


Cedar Shake Vinyl Siding Cost

Cedar-look shakes made of vinyl cost between $2.50 and $8 a square foot. This siding is usually sold in rows that are 2 or 3 deep. Each row typically measures about 6 inches wide, although you may find some manufacturers that make them 5 or 7 inches wide. These shakes are usually heavily embossed to give them the look of real wood grain. They come in several colors, and it is common to install them along with lap siding to give more visual interest to the home. They may be hollow, premium, or insulated.

Cost of Hand-Split Shake Vinyl Siding

Hand-split vinyl siding shakes range from $2.50 to $8 a square foot on average, depending on the type. This is a more rustic-looking shingle than the cedar-look versions. The shakes are usually about 7 inches wide, but they are also often irregular or staggered on the bottoms for a more unpolished look. So while they may be sold as 7-inch widths, the actual rows could include sections of 5 or 6-inch deep. This is a good accent for rustic-style homes, and these may be hollow, premium, or insulated.

Scalloped Vinyl Siding Prices

Vinyl siding shingles with a scalloped bottom edge are available for between $3 and $8 a square foot on average. This is an excellent siding for accenting small areas on the home, such as beneath gables. It is very common for this type of siding to be paired with lap siding, with the lap siding being installed over most of the home and the scalloped shingles saved for special areas. These shingles are generally 6 to 7 inches wide at the lowest point of the rounded bottom edge. This style is less common, so they may be limited in colors and types.

Vinyl Log Siding Cost

Vinyl log-look siding costs between $4 and $10 a square foot, depending on the type. This is a hollow vinyl siding that is made to mimic the look of a log home. It can be installed over the exterior of any home, regardless of type, to give it a more rustic appearance. The log-look vinyl generally comes with a wood grain texture and in widths up to 12 inches. This is a less expensive and easier-to-maintain way to achieve the look of a log home. While real log homes are high maintenance, simply putting a vinyl exterior onto an existing home is a way to accomplish that look more easily.

Brick-Look Vinyl Siding Cost

Vinyl siding panels that give you the look of brick range from $4 to $10 a square foot on average. While less common than other types of vinyl siding or faux brick, vinyl brick-look siding can be effective when used as an accent combined with other types of siding. This siding is installed in single rows, perhaps around the perimeter of your home. For that reason, the panels are generally at least 2 feet wide, while the actual brick rows may vary from 2 to 4 inches in width. This vinyl siding is uncommon, so you may have fewer options when it comes to color, thickness, and other attributes.

Stone-Look Vinyl Siding Cost

Vinyl siding panels that have the look of faux stone 6 cost between $4 and $10 a square foot. This vinyl siding is meant to be used as an accent to give you the look of fieldstone. The panels are generally a little thicker with a distinct texture. The “stones” are often of differing sizes to create a natural appearance, and they can also vary in color. The panels themselves may be 12 to 24 inches wide, while the stones may have varying widths within a panel. This vinyl siding is less common, so colors and styles may be limited.


Consult with a pro when installing vinyl siding

Vinyl Siding Prices by Brand

There are many manufacturers of vinyl 1 siding. Some specialize in certain types, while others make a range of different products to choose from. Each has a price point and other attributes to consider:


Cost per Square Foot of Georgia Pacific, Wolverine, Town Square, Alside, Mastic, and Rollex Vinyl Siding

Cost per Square Foot of Georgia Pacific, Wolverine, Town Square, Alside, Mastic, and Rollex Vinyl Siding


BrandsAverage Costs per Square Foot (Material Only)
Georgia Pacific$1.15 - $8
Wolverine$1.50 - $7
Town Square$2 - $6.50
Alside$2.50 - $8.50
Mastic$2.50 - $8.50
Rollex$4 - $7


Georgia Pacific Vinyl Siding Prices

Georgia Pacific vinyl siding costs between $1.15 and $8 a square foot on average, depending on the type and style. They make both lap siding and shingle vinyl siding in a range of colors. Their styles are simple, and they also make matching soffits, fascia, and skirting products. They offer basic hollow siding as well as premium insulated vinyl siding. This means that you can easily find a product that fits your needs and budget.

Wolverine Vinyl Siding Prices

Wolverine vinyl siding is among the least expensive at $1.50 to $7 a square foot. Wolverine makes a line of reasonably good quality lap sidings. The product is made by Certainteed and is available in a very wide range of vivid colors. It comes in 4 basic types, with different thicknesses and other details, including a smooth option for mimicking historic home styles.

Town Square Vinyl Siding Prices

On average, it costs between $2 and $6.50 per square foot to install Town Square vinyl siding. This type of siding features a brushed wood grain that is available in a variety of colors, which will give your home an authentically luxurious look. Town Square vinyl siding is available in both a traditional panel and a Dutch lap board. On top of enhancing your home’s look, this type of vinyl siding is extremely durable and can protect your property from high winds and hail storms.

Alside Vinyl Siding Cost

Alside vinyl siding ranges from $2.50 to $8.50 a square foot on average. This is a premium siding that offers both thicker planks and insulated planks, in several different colors and styles. This material is designed to give you better performance, with panels that require less caulking and thick rigid foam for better insulation. Their materials are also generally easier to install than other hollow back materials.

Mastic Vinyl Siding Cost

Mastic vinyl siding from Ply-Gem costs between $2.50 and $8.50 a square foot. This company focuses on making vinyl siding that has the appearance of shakes and shingles. These are a thicker vinyl material than some lap sidings, so it tends to be more durable. It is fairly easy to install, being designed for interlocking. The siding comes in a range of different colors and is easy to maintain.

Rollex Vinyl Siding

Expect to pay between $4 and $7 a square foot for vinyl siding from Rollex. They redesigned their vinyl siding to be much easier to install. This is a very thick siding that stays rigid, so it can be installed by a single person instead of needing a team to hold each plank. The planks interlock for a quick installation. The vinyl can be insulated as well for better energy efficiency. This siding comes in a wide range of popular colors.

Labor Costs to Install Vinyl Siding

Most vinyl siding is very fast and easy to install, with costs between $1 and $3 a square foot on average. The material is lightweight, and except for the first course, which must be nailed down, each successive course simply locks into the one below. This means that installation proceeds quickly. The average time to install vinyl siding is between four and ten days, whereas other types can take up to two weeks or more. The total time it takes for installation depends on the size and style of your home and how many contractors are on the job. A good siding installation team keeps you up to date as they go, so you can have a good idea of when the project will be done.

Premium and insulated vinyl sidings tend to be easier and less expensive to install than hollow materials. This is because the lightweight hollow siding tends to be bendy and floppy, so it needs at least two people per plank to lift, position, and attach. Premium and insulated materials, although still lightweight, are thicker and more rigid and easier to manage. This means that a single person can lift, move, and install the panels.

Because vinyl siding goes up 2 to 4 rows at a time, it is much faster to install than wood siding. For this reason, the cost of installation is only between $1 and $3 a square foot for most jobs. For example, in a 1,500 sq.ft installation, labor costs between $1,500 and $4,500 out of the $9,000 total.

Average Cost to Replace Vinyl Siding

Vinyl siding lasts about 20 years on average, so it often needs to be replaced sooner than other siding materials. Replacing old siding has costs identical to a new siding job. However, you also have removal and disposal fees associated with this project.

Vinyl siding is made of plastic, and since few recyclers accept this material, there is often a steep disposal fee of around $500. In addition, expect to pay an additional $1 to $2 a square foot in labor fees to remove the old siding, install new house wrap, and make any necessary repairs.

This makes the total cost range to replace vinyl siding over a 1,500 sq.ft. exterior between $5,450 and $23,000 on average.


New Vinyl Siding Installed


Cost to Install Vinyl Siding Over Existing Siding

If you’re planning on installing vinyl over your existing siding, you can expect to pay between $7,000 and $22,500 for a 1,500 sq.ft. home, depending on the type of siding you currently have on your exterior. Before deciding to install over existing siding, make sure it is fastened 7 tightly to your home and is still in good condition.


Cost to Install Vinyl Siding Over Wood, Stucco, Foam Board, or Brick Siding

Cost to Install Vinyl Siding Over Wood, Stucco, Foam Board, or Brick Siding


Existing Siding MaterialAverage Cost (Materials and Labor)
Wood$7,000 - $17,000
Stucco$8,000 - $18,500
Foam Board$8,000 - $19,000
Brick$8,500 - $22,500


Vinyl Siding Over Wood Siding

Installing vinyl over wood siding costs between $7,000 and $17,000. This also goes for vinyl siding over clapboard, one of the most basic forms of wood siding. Your existing siding will be a solid base for your vinyl siding, but your contractors will have to make sure the wood siding is in good shape. If your wood siding is lapped or beveled, your installers will have to use pressure-treated furring strips to provide a level surface for the new siding.

Vinyl Siding Over Stucco Cost

Installing vinyl siding over stucco 8 siding costs between $8,000 and $18,500. Your siding contractors will have to take a few steps before undergoing the installation process as it cannot be installed directly over the stucco. First, they will have to repair any damage to the existing siding. Then, they will install furring strips and glue insulation boards to the stucco in between them. The new vinyl siding will then go on top of that.

Vinyl Siding Over Foam Board

It costs between $8,000 and $19,000 to install vinyl siding over foam board siding. The process is fairly straightforward but should be left to a professional. Vinyl siding can be installed directly over foam board with longer nails that extend through and attach firmly to the base.

Vinyl Siding Over Brick

If you’re installing vinyl siding over your brick exterior, you can expect to pay between $8,500 and $22,500. This is a particularly difficult process since brick is not smooth or level, so it’s crucial to have a professional on your side. Your vinyl siding contractors will attach furring strips along the exterior, install insulation or caulking 9, and then install the vinyl siding panels.


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Painting Vinyl Siding vs Replacing

If your vinyl siding is not at the end of its lifespan but you want to give it a new look, you can always paint it. The key is that vinyl must be painted with an acrylic-based paint applied over an adhesive primer 10.

Without using the proper primer and paint, normal exterior paints can simply peel off the vinyl siding. The cost to paint a 1,500 sq.ft. home exterior is around $5,170, which is less expensive than even the least costly replacement options.

Vinyl siding does not have a very long lifespan, and painting it will not increase that. If your siding is more than 15 years old, consider replacing it instead of painting it because you will likely need to do so soon anyway.

Vinyl Siding Colors

Vinyl siding is a unique siding because its color goes right through each plank. This means that the color lasts as long as the siding does, without peeling, chipping, or flaking.

Each brand of siding has its own line of colors. And, each company also likely has unique color shades, such as Redstone from one company and Sedona from another, each describing a very similar shade.

It is also important to note that vinyl siding is subject to dye lots. This means that if you purchase half the siding you need now and half in a few months, the two lots may not match one another, even when purchased from the same company. Likewise, if you need to purchase a few planks for repair down the road, they may not precisely match. For this reason, purchase all the material you need at the same time and verify with the distributor that it all comes from the same dye lot, and also order a few extra planks in case you need to make repairs.

While every company has its own proprietary line of colors, some of the more common colors that you will find in vinyl siding include:


Vinyl Siding Colors: White, Cream, Beige, Tan, Brick Red, Sage Green, Hunter Green...

Vinyl Siding Colors: White, Cream, Beige, Tan, Brick Red, Sage Green, Hunter Green...


How Much Vinyl Siding Do I Need?

Vinyl siding is typically sold and installed by the square foot. However, it is also sold by the box or carton. A box or carton may contain anywhere from 25 to 200 square feet, so you will have to round up how much you need to the nearest whole box.

To find out how much you need, first measure the height and width of each area of your exterior. Measure in inches. When you multiply the height and width of a section, this will give you the total square inches of that section. Add up the total square inches of each section you calculate, and divide by 144. The result gives you the total number of square feet you need.

It is important to order at least 10% more in case of breakage or damage. If your total square foot figure comes within 10% of the number of full boxes you need, you may want to add one more box. It is always better to have too much siding and have some left over for repairs, than not have enough to complete the job.

Vinyl Siding Pros and Cons

Vinyl siding was the second-ever siding introduced to be a lower maintenance alternative to wood, following behind aluminum siding by just a few years. When compared to wood siding, vinyl has much lower maintenance. It does not peel, chip, or flake, and it is also water and insect-resistant. When used in heavy rainfall areas, it can act as its own rain screen when installed over furring strips.

Vinyl siding works best when installed in moderate climates. It is made of plastic, so it can soften or melt in very high heat. It is also highly flammable and can direct flames up to the attic of your home, so it is not recommended for areas prone to wildfires.

Vinyl can also become brittle in cold weather. This means that in cold climates, it is more likely to crack or break than other types of siding.

Alone, vinyl is a poor insulator. With foam insulation backing, however, vinyl can help lower energy bills in all climates.

Since vinyl is made of plastic, it is difficult to recycle or even contain recycled content. For those reasons and it only usually lasts about 20 years, vinyl cannot be considered an eco-friendly material.


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Vinyl Siding Maintenance

Vinyl 1 siding is fairly low maintenance, particularly when compared with wood siding. Like all siding, it should be inspected annually to make sure that the caulk around windows and doors is intact. Replace any missing caulk as needed.

Clean vinyl siding as needed with a pressure washer. Wood grain siding may hold onto dirt and algae more than smooth, in which case a stiff brush and detergent may be needed to agitate the siding and remove stains.


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Vertical Vinyl Siding Cost vs Horizontal

While most vinyl siding is installed horizontally, including lap siding, shingle siding, panels, and log-look siding, there are a few types that can be installed vertically. Board and batten is the most common of the vertical types. Horizontal vinyl siding costs range quite a bit because they encompass so many different types. This means a range of costs between $1.30 and $10 a square foot.

Vertical vinyl siding costs are more narrow because of the more limited options. These materials cost between $2.50 and $8 a square foot on average.

Installation costs for both types range from $1 to $3 a square foot because they have variations in thickness and sizes that influence how easy or difficult they are to install.

Brick vs Vinyl Siding Cost

Vinyl and brick are two of the most popular siding options on the market. The average cost to install brick siding on a 1,500 sq.ft. surface ranges from $12,000 to $20,000. Installing the same amount of vinyl siding is a bit more cost-effective, with an average price range of $7,500 - $12,000. This is because vinyl is a less expensive material, and it’s easier to install due to its light weight.

Both materials have their fair share of pros and cons, so choosing the right one for your home depends on your wants and needs. Vinyl siding is eco-friendly, affordable, and convenient, making it a great choice for a wide range of projects. It is smaller in size and makes up less than 2% of waste on a construction site. The manufacturing process is also less harmful to the environment.

On the other hand, brick makes up more than 12% of all waste, and it’s much heavier, too. This makes it more expensive and more difficult to install. On the plus side, its heavy weight makes it very durable and makes it possible for it to last as long as a century.

Aluminum vs Vinyl Siding

Aluminum siding was introduced just before vinyl as the first alternative to wood siding. Aluminum siding comes in a range of colors and styles, although it tends to be more limited in options than vinyl. Aluminum is resistant to moisture and insect activity and is flame-retardant. However, it dents and fades, necessitating frequent repainting.

Aluminum is one of the least expensive types of metal siding at $2 to $3 a square foot. This makes it comparable with most mid-range vinyl sidings, although vinyl can be less or more expensive, depending on the style.

Fiber Cement Siding vs Vinyl

When looking for a more durable alternative to vinyl, fiber cement siding may be a good choice. This is a blend of cellulose fiber, sand, silica, and Portland cement. It comes in many different forms and styles. Is resistant to moisture, insects, cracking, and warping and is also flame-retardant. It lasts about 50 years on average, compared to vinyl, which lasts about 20 years. Vinyl siding is less expensive, with costs starting at $1.30 a square foot, while fiber cement starts at $4 a square foot. However, fiber cement is much more durable, lasting more than twice as long as vinyl.

Wood vs Vinyl Siding

Vinyl siding was first created as a lower maintenance alternative to wood siding. While wood comes in a nearly endless array of different species, characteristics, styles, and shapes, it tends to be fairly high maintenance. It needs to be painted about every 5 to 7 years, and many wood types are susceptible to moisture damage and insects. Vinyl does not need to be painted and resists these issues. Wood has a very wide range of costs, from $1.50 to $30 a square foot, depending on the type, making vinyl almost always the less expensive option.


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Enhancement and Improvement Costs

Vinyl Fascia and Soffits

The average cost to install vinyl soffits and fascia ranges between $6 and $9 per linear foot, including labor and materials. A soffit is an overhang on a home’s exterior where your roof meets your siding. The fascia refers to the board that runs along the side of the soffit to help enhance your curb appeal. Vinyl soffits and fascia work together with your gutter system to divert water away from your property. They will also help keep your home protected from extreme temperatures throughout the year and control moisture levels in the attic.

Exterior Vinyl Trim Costs

When installing vinyl siding on your home, you may want to include vinyl trim in the project at an average cost of $1,800. Vinyl trim is made to match vinyl siding and is made of the same material. It helps cover edges and gives a finished look to any installation. For the best results, use the same brand and manufacturer for both the trim and siding.

Cost to Paint Vinyl Siding

It is possible to paint your vinyl siding for around $3,000-$5,000. It is important to use an adhesive primer so that the paint will bond to the vinyl. Otherwise, it will peel off. The vinyl should first be cleaned and allowed to dry. Vinyl only lasts about 20 years, so if your vinyl is older than 15 years, consider replacing it rather than painting it.

Adding Insulation to Your Vinyl Siding

There are two ways that you can add insulation to vinyl siding. You can purchase pre-insulated siding for between $8 and $10 a square foot on average, or you can have rigid foam insulation, such as IPS or XPS, installed beneath it. This has a cost of around $5 a square foot on average. Both options will improve the energy efficiency of your home.

Old Siding Removal

If you have new vinyl siding installed on an existing home, you need to have the old siding removed first. This can have a wide range of costs, depending on the siding type. Costs can start at a flat fee of $500 or be as high as $1 to $2 a square foot for the labor and disposal.

Gutter Installation

Installing new siding is a good time to install new gutters. Gutters can be made of vinyl to match your siding or of other materials like aluminum or steel. Gutters cost around $1,460 to install for most homes.

Soffit Installation

The soffit is the trim that covers the underside of your roof, protecting your rafters. It is installed along with the other trim on your home and is included in that cost. Soffits can be made of vinyl. For best results, use a perforated soffit because this allows ventilation in the eaves, which helps prevent moisture buildup.

Additional Considerations and Costs

  • Architectural details. If your home has many angles, curves, or other architectural details, your labor costs could be higher than they would be for flat walls.
  • Structural repairs. Your home may need some structural repair work before the siding can be installed. Sometimes, this is not discovered until the old siding is removed.
  • Permits. Like all siding installations, you need a permit pulled to install new vinyl siding. Speak to your town or city hall for more information.
  • Wind resistance. Most vinyl siding is rated for winds up to 100mph, but because it is so lightweight, it can still sometimes be pulled off. It is generally easy to reinstall, however.
  • Lifespan. Vinyl siding lasts for about 20 years on average. However, its color stays true the entire time, unlike other materials like wood or aluminum that need to be repainted frequently.
  • DIY. Vinyl siding can be installed DIY, but having it done professionally helps increase its longevity. Proper installation can guard against expansion, cracking, bulging, and warping that an inexperienced installation may lead to.
  • Recycling. Vinyl siding is not considered a green material. It is made of polyvinyl chloride (PVC), and during its manufacture, it emits greenhouse gasses, including nitrogen oxide and sulfur dioxide. It is also very difficult to recycle.

FAQs

  • How much does it cost to add a window in vinyl siding?

Adding a new window to an existing wall costs between $1,000 and $5,000, depending on the window. The siding type does not matter.

  • Which is better, aluminum or vinyl siding?

This depends on what you want from your siding and where you live. Aluminum is higher maintenance, but it does well in all climates and is flame-retardant. Vinyl does best in moderate climates and wet areas.

  • How much does a square of vinyl siding cover?

When it comes to estimating how much siding you’ll need for your home’s exterior, it’s important to understand the common units of measurements and lingo. A square of vinyl siding, for example, is equivalent to 100 square feet.

  • Does vinyl siding add value to your home?

It may, depending on the home type and what you are replacing. Vinyl only lasts about 20 years and can crack in cold climates and melt in hot ones, so it is not always the best choice.

  • What is the average labor cost to install vinyl siding?

Labor costs to install vinyl siding range from $1 to $3 a square foot on average, depending on the type and condition of your home.

  • How much does a box of vinyl siding cover?

This depends on the manufacturer and vinyl siding type. A box may contain 25 sq.ft. or 200 sq.ft. Ask the retailer for the square feet in the box you are considering.

  • How much vinyl siding do I need for a 24’ x 24’ garage?

This depends on the height of your walls, their condition, the roof slope, and whether this is the only material being installed. Measure each wall separately in inches. Multiply the height and width of each wall, and add up the four walls. Divide this number by 144 to get the square feet you need for the project. Add in about 10% extra for cuts.

Remodeling Terms Cheat Sheet

Definitions in laymen's terms, cost considerations, pictures and things you need to know.
See full cheat sheet.
glossary term picture Vinyl 1 Vinyl: A synthetic plastic made from ethylene and chlorine. Vinyl has many applications in the construction industry and it is widely used in sidings, window frames, roofing and gutters, among others
glossary term picture Elbow 2 Elbow: An L-shaped fitting used to connect two straight pipes to enable their flow to go around a corner
glossary term picture Shingle 3 Shingles: A smooth, uniform, flat piece of construction material, available in a wide variety of materials and laid in a series of overlapping rows, used to cover the outside of roofs or walls to protect against weather damage and leaks.
glossary term picture Shake 4 Shakes: A rugged flat piece of wooden construction material with at least one grain-split face, generally made of either redwood or cedar, laid in a series of overlapping rows and used to cover the outside of roofs and walls to protect against weather damage and leaks
5 Hand-split shake: Wood shakes used for siding or roofing. They have the natural texture of hand-split wood rather than being perfectly smooth like sawn wood
glossary term picture Faux Stone 6 Faux stone: A building material made from concrete set in molds and then painted to look like stone.
7 Fastened: Hardware used to attach two or more objects to each other. A common example is a nail
glossary term picture Stucco 8 Stucco: A type of durable plaster finish made of aggregates, a binder, and water (traditionally Portland cement, sand, and water) used on masonry, walls, ceilings, and decorative moldings
glossary term picture Caulking 9 Caulking: A chemical sealant used to fill in and seal gaps where two materials join, for example, the tub and tile, to create a watertight and airtight seal. The term "caulking" is also used to refer to the process of applying this type of sealant
glossary term picture Primer 10 Primer: Preparatory coat applied to materials (drywall, wood, metal, etc.) before painting to ensure paint adhesion, extend paint durability, and help seal and protect the surface to be painted

Cost to install vinyl siding varies greatly by region (and even by zip code). To get free estimates from local contractors, please indicate yours.

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The information provided by our cost guides comes from a great variety of sources, including specialized publications and websites, cost studies, U.S. associations, reports from the U.S. government, contractors and subcontractors, material suppliers, material price services, and other vendor websites. For more information, read our Methodology and sources
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Cost to install vinyl siding varies greatly by region (and even by zip code). To get free estimates from local contractors, please indicate yours.

The information provided by our cost guides comes from a great variety of sources, including specialized publications and websites, cost studies, U.S. associations, reports from the U.S. government, contractors and subcontractors, material suppliers, material price services, and other vendor websites. For more information, read our Methodology and sources