facebook pixel
cost guide icon
 

Outdoor Spigot Installation Cost

Outdoor Spigot Installation Cost

National average
$225
(installing a new hose bib spigot in an unfinished basement)
Low: $100

(replacing an existing spigot with a new one)

High: $2,500

(installing a yard hydrant more than 6 feet from the house)

Cost to install an outdoor spigot varies greatly by region (and even by zip code).
Get free estimates from plumbers in your city.

The average cost of installing an outdoor spigot is around $225.

In this guide

Types of outdoor spigots and faucets
Installation
Labor costs
Keeping your faucet from freezing
Maintenance
Enhancement and improvement costs
FAQ

How much does it cost to install an outdoor spigot?

An outdoor spigot can enhance the use of your outdoor living space. With an outdoor spigot, it is easier to maintain lawns and gardens, clean outdoor furniture and siding, and have easy and reliable access to water. If your home does not already have an outdoor spigot, it is possible to install a new one for about $225 on average.

Types of outdoor spigots and faucets

Originally, the outdoor spigot was a simple offshoot of your plumbing with a handle you twist to open and shut the valve. But today, a much wider variety is available. Depending on your climate, its location, and your needs, you may want one of the following:

TypeDescriptionCost
Ball valve

Simple, indoor/outdoor valve

Has a single hole for water to pass through

$5 - $20
Hose bib

Standard outdoor spigot

Has threading to attach a hose to

$14 - $30
Frost free

Long tube with valve located inside the house

Angled downward to drain the water outside and prevent freezing

$15 - $30
Anti-siphon

Prevents backflow

Required in some communities

$30 - $100
Yard hydrant

Any spigot that is located directly in the ground

Not attached directly to the house

$50 - $100

Installation

Installation of an outdoor spigot is relatively straightforward in most cases. Water is shut off to the area, and the pipe that the spigot will be supplied by is cut. A “T” is installed at the cut to divert water to the new pipe for the spigot. A hole is drilled through the home’s foundation, and the pipe for the spigot is fitted through and connected to the pipe inside at the T. If you are not installing a frost free valve, sometimes an internal valve is installed inside to allow you to shut off the water to the spigot. The entire process takes only an hour or two start to finish.

Labor costs

Most of the costs associated with the installation of an outdoor spigot are in the labor. The spigot itself costs around $20, while additional parts cost about $30. The remaining $175 is for the installation of the spigot. Plumbers charge between $45 and $65 an hour, but for small jobs like this, you often find that they charge a one-time fee.

Keeping your faucet from freezing

If you are not installing a frost free faucet and live in an area where the spigot may freeze, you need to take steps to prevent this from happening. If the water inside the spigot or pipes freeze, it will expand. Depending on how quickly this expansion happens, it could cause the pipe or spigot to split. This can necessitate repairs, which can cost an additional $150, depending on where the split occurs.

To prevent this, make sure that the spigot is drained before the possibility of freezing temperatures. Shut off the valve that supplies the water to the spigot, then open the tap, and let the water drain out. Remove the hose if it is attached, and store it indoors until the spring.

Maintenance

Outdoor spigots need little maintenance beyond draining them before winter. Occasionally, they may become difficult to turn, so applying a small amount of lubricant to the tap handle can help it turn more smoothly if this occurs.

Enhancement and improvement costs

Installing a water line

If you are running pipes to a yard hydrant or need 6 feet or more run in order to reach your outdoor spigot location, you need to have a new water line put in. This costs around $1,500 to $2,000 on average to run 6 feet of copper pipe.

Additional considerations and costs

  • If you install more than one outdoor spigot, it can save you from needing to run a hose from one end of the yard to the other.
  • If you have a crawl space below your home or an unfinished basement, this can make the labor portion go more quickly, which may save money on labor costs.
  • If your plumber needs to run pipes through finished walls or ceilings, your costs will be higher because you will also need to hire a contractor to complete the finish work.
  • This is a simple job and can often be done DIY if the pipes are located nearby, and you have the correct tools for the job.
  • Never over tighten the tap on the spigot. This can cause wear to the gasket 1 and may cause drips. If this occurs, the gasket 1 will need to be replaced, in most cases for under $100.

FAQ

  • How much does it cost to replace an outdoor spigot?

Replacing an existing spigot is a simple job and costs less than $100 on average.

  • How do you raise an outdoor spigot?

Raising an outdoor spigot to a new height means T-ing off of your pipe inside and installing a new, longer pipe before cutting a new hole, and installing the spigot.​​

  • What size is a water spigot?

Like most plumbing, spigots can be found in ½ and ¾-inch sizes.

  • How do you keep outdoor faucets from freezing?

The simplest way to keep an outdoor faucet from freezing is to shut off the valve inside and drain the faucet.​​

Was this guide helpful to you?
  

Remodeling Terms Cheat Sheet

Definitions in laymen's terms, cost considerations, pictures and things you need to know.
See full cheat sheet.
1 Gasket: A seal that fills the space between two or more surfaces that are joined together, allowing a tight seal even when the surfaces do not fit against each other perfectly

Cost to install an outdoor spigot varies greatly by region (and even by zip code). To get free estimates from local contractors, please indicate yours.

Outdoor spigot on a red brick wall

Labor cost by city and zip code

Compared to national average
Albuquerque, NM
-14%
Ashville, OH
-23%
Athens, GA
-9%
Atlanta, GA
+24%
Austin, TX
+13%
Berkeley, CA
+39%
Boise, ID
-11%
Brick, NJ
+3%
Bronx, NY
+32%
Brooklyn, NY
+16%
Buffalo, NY
-1%
Chicago, IL
+40%
Cincinnati, OH
+6%
Columbus, GA
-20%
Columbus, OH
+5%
Comanche, TX
-37%
Corona, CA
+19%
Dallas, TX
+10%
Denver, CO
+1%
Detroit, MI
+16%
Ellenwood, GA
-4%
Fayetteville, NC
-20%
Fort Lauderdale, FL
+2%
Fort Mill, SC
-13%
Fremont, CA
+35%
Greensboro, NC
-9%
Greenwood, IN
-20%
Hampton, VA
-18%
Henderson, NV
+10%
Hillsboro, OR
+15%
Houston, TX
+24%
Jacksonville, FL
-1%
Jonesboro, GA
-4%
Kansas City, MO
+4%
Katy, TX
+63%
Lanexa, VA
-29%
Las Vegas, NV
+7%
Little Rock, AR
0%
Livonia, MI
+16%
Long Beach, CA
+16%
Los Angeles, CA
+11%
Macon, MO
-47%
Manchester, PA
+1%
Memphis, TN
+11%
Metairie, LA
+31%
Miami, FL
+1%
Milwaukee, WI
+12%
Minneapolis, MN
+25%
Modesto, CA
-12%
Nashville, TN
+21%
Labor cost in your zip code
Last modified:   
Methodology and sources