How Much Does It Cost to Replace a Roof in Michigan?

National Average Range:
$9,000 - $30,000
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Reviewed by Paula Reguero. Written by Fixr.com.

Michigan is a large, northern state that sees a lot of snow, ice, and the effects of nearby lakes. Summers are hot and sunny, while winters see storms and hail that batter your roof. Many Michigan roofs do not last longer than 15 to 20 years and require replacement to protect the home from the elements. A roof in poor condition can lead to problems with moisture, including mold, mildew, damp walls, sagging ceilings, and wood rot. Replacing your Michigan roof as it ages can prevent these issues while maintaining your home’s curb appeal.

The state average cost to replace a roof in Michigan is $9,000 to $30,000, with most homeowners paying $15,000 for a 2,000 sq.ft. roof replacement using mid-grade architectural shingles on a cross gable roof. This project’s low cost is $4,500 for a 1,000 sq.ft. roof replacement on a gable roof using basic architectural shingles. The high cost is $60,000 for a 2,000 sq.ft. roof replacement using slate tiles on a salt-box roof with deck reinforcement.

Roof Replacement Cost in Michigan

New Roof Cost in Michigan
National average cost$15,000
Average range$9,000-$30,000
Low-end$4,500
High-end$60,000

Roof Replacement in Michigan Cost by Project Range

Low
$4,500
1,000 sq.ft. roof replacement on a gable roof using basic architectural shingles
Average Cost
$15,000
2,000 sq.ft. roof replacement using mid-grade architectural shingles on a cross gable roof
High
$60,000
2,000 sq.ft. roof replacement using slate shingles on a salt-box roof with deck reinforcement

Average Cost of Roof Replacement in Michigan by Size

Homes in Michigan come in many sizes and configurations, resulting in various roofs. Most Michigan roofs are sloped gable roofs, including the popular salt-box gable and cross gables, but you will also see hipped roofs and dormer roofs. Salt-box roofs, cross gables, and hipped roofs typically require more shingles 1 than a plain or boxed gable roof. This leads to a range of roof sizes. Typically, larger homes have larger roofs. If you opt for a roof style like a salt-box or hipped roof that performs better in the Michigan climate, you have a larger-than-average roof for your home size.

Costs for roofs in Michigan range from $4.50 to $26 per sq.ft. for most roofs, or $450 to $2,600 per square, which is 100 sq.ft. The more complex your roof, the higher the average costs. Below are the average costs for installing a roof in Michigan based on the size.

Cost to replace a 1,000, 1,200, 1,350, 1,500, 2,000, 2,200, 3,000, 3,750, and 4,500 sq.ft. roof in Michigan and the US

Cost to replace a 1,000, 1,200, 1,350, 1,500, 2,000, 2,200, 3,000, 3,750, and 4,500 sq.ft. roof in Michigan and the US

Roof SizeReplacement Cost (Michigan)Replacement Cost (National Average)
1,000 sq.ft.$4,500 - $26,000$3,500 - $9,000
1,200 sq.ft.$5,400 - $31,200$4,200 - $10,800
1,350 sq.ft.$6,075 - $35,100$4,725 - $12,150
1,500 sq.ft.$6,750 - $39,000$5,250 - $13,500
2,000 sq.ft.$9,000 - $52,000$7,000 - $18,000
2,200 sq.ft.$9,900 - $57,200$7,700 - $19,800
3,000 sq.ft.$13,500 - $78,000$10,500 - $27,000
3,750 sq.ft.$16,875 - $97,500$13,125 - $33,750
4,500 sq.ft.$20,250 - $117,000$15,750 - $40,500

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Average Roof Replacement Cost in Michigan by Pitch

Most Michigan homes have a conventionally sloped roof. A small percentage are low slope or steep slope 2. Your roof’s slope or pitch impacts your installation costs. Low slope roofs of 2/12 to 3/12 in pitch can use some types of asphalt 3 shingles but may not be the right candidates for other roofing because of wind and snow causing problems for the shingles and roof deck. Steep sloped roofs with a pitch of 8/12 or higher are difficult to work on and have higher-than-average labor costs. Pitch is measured by the number of inches a roof rises over a horizontal span of 12”. Most roofs in Michigan fall between 4/12 and 7/12, meaning they rise 4” to 7” for every 12” horizontally. Below are the average costs per square foot for each roof pitch in the state.

Cost per sq.ft. to replace a low, conventional, and steep slope roof in Michigan and the US

Cost per sq.ft. to replace a low, conventional, and steep slope roof in Michigan and the US

Roof PitchCost per Sq.Ft. (Michigan)Cost per Sq.Ft. (National Average)
Low Slope$4.50 - $15$4.50 - $7
Conventional Slope$4.50 - $23$3.50 - $9
Steep Slope$6.50 - $26$5 - $12

Average Cost of Roof Replacement in Michigan by Material

Michigan sees harsh weather, including hail, high winds, snow, and sun. This means that while basic asphalt shingles are available, these materials can fail quickly and may lead to leaks and more roof repairs. The most common asphalt shingles are architectural asphalt, available in several grades, including basic, luxury, and designer. Most roofs in Michigan have one of these roofs. However, other materials may be used in the state, which may be more durable in the harsh climate. These include metal, cedar shingle, and slate roofs. These roofs can have different costs for the material and labor because some are more difficult to install than others. Below are the average costs per square foot installed in Michigan and the U.S. for each material.

Cost per sq.ft. to replace a roof in Michigan and the US by material: asphalt shingles, architectural shingles, metal…

Cost per sq.ft. to replace a roof in Michigan and the US by material: asphalt shingles, architectural shingles, metal…

MaterialCost per Sq.Ft. (Michigan)Cost per Sq.Ft. (National Average)
Asphalt Shingles$4.50 - $6.50$3 - $15
Architectural Shingles$4.50 - $15$3 - $15
Cedar$5.50 - $15$8 - $12
Metal$6 - $20$4 - $40
Slate$10 - $23$1.50 - $30

Average Roof Replacement Cost in Michigan by Shape

Michigan roofs see wind, rain, hail, snow, and sun. Most Michigan roofs are sloped and designed to withstand winds. Gable roofs are popular, including box, Dutch, and cross gables. One of the more popular types is the salt-box, which is technically a gable roof with one side extending longer than the other, making snow removal easier on at least one side. Hipped roofs are also popular because they perform well in high winds. Salt-box and hipped roofs are larger than basic gable roofs, so you may need more material. Dormer roofs are also popular in the state. These roofs can be more difficult to roof because of their complexity, so they may have higher costs. Gambrel roofs are less common but still seen often enough to be significant in the state. This roof does not hold up as well to the high winds, but it is popular for homes because it creates a wider, more usable top floor. This is an expensive roof to install because of the steep sides. Below are the average costs per square foot for each roofing style in Michigan and the U.S.

Cost per sq.ft. to replace a gable, hipped, dutch, salt-box, dormer, and gambrel roof in Michigan and the US

Cost per sq.ft. to replace a gable, hipped, dutch, salt-box, dormer, and gambrel roof in Michigan and the US

ShapeCost per Sq.Ft. (Michigan)Cost per Sq.Ft. (National Average)
Gable$4.50 - $23$3.50 - $9
Hipped$4.50 - $23$3.50 - $9
Dutch$4.50 - $23$3.50 - $9
Salt-Box$4.50 - $23$3.50 - $31
Dormer$5.50 - $24$4 - $10
Gambrel$6.50 - $26$4 - $20

Roof Replacement Cost Breakdown (Michigan)

When a Michigan roof leaks and fails, it most often requires a full replacement, including a tear-off of the existing roof rather than a roof over. This is because of the amount of ice and snow that the state sees. While codes dictate that an ice shield be added to roofs, the minimum amount is often insufficient to fully protect a roof and roof deck. So, when an older roof begins to fail, it usually means that a tear-off is necessary to remove the old underlayment 4, make repairs to the roof deck, and install a new ice shield. While roofing over is legal in the state, it is not recommended because it voids the warranty on the new shingles and can mask issues with the current roof. Most roofers recommend removing the existing roof and shingles and inspecting the deck before installing new shingles. Roofers in Michigan charge $80 to $100 per hour for a full tear-off, roof inspection, and new material installation. Below is the average breakdown of a roof replacement in Michigan per square foot.

Roof replacement cost breakdown per sq.ft. in Michigan: tear-off, material, and installation

Roof replacement cost breakdown per sq.ft. in Michigan: tear-off, material, and installation

Project AreaCost per Sq.Ft.
Tear-Off (Optional$1 - $3
Material$1.50 - $12
Installtion$2 - $11

Removing Old Roofing vs Roofing Over in Michigan

Roofing over layers of shingles or metal roofing over an existing layer of asphalt shingles is technically legal in Michigan but not recommended. Most roofers in Michigan recommend a full roof replacement rather than a roof over. This is because the amount of snow, ice, and hail that Michigan sees, along with sun and high winds, can damage the existing shingles and underlayment. Installing another roofing layer on top does not address these issues, so moisture problems can persist. In addition, this process may void the warranty for your new roof and shorten its lifespan. Removing the old roofing can address issues and install a better ice shield on the roof, making your new roof last longer and preventing moisture or structural issues.

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Enhancement and Improvement Costs

Skylight Replacement

If you have a skylight on your roof, a roof replacement is a good time to replace the skylight. Removing a skylight from an existing roof means removing some of the roof material around it first, and then installing the new skylight and replacing the material. If the roof is torn off first, replacing the skylight becomes easier and less expensive. The average cost to replace a skylight is $800 to $2,200.

Cost to Redeck a Roof

You may need to replace or reinforce your roof deck if it is older. After the tear-off, your roofer can inspect the deck and let you know if issues must be addressed. Roof reinforcement and partial redecking in Michigan have costs starting at $1,500. Full redecking costs $4,000 to $5,000.

Additional Considerations and Costs

  • Permits. A permit is not required in Michigan for a roof replacement. However, if you need to replace more than 2 pieces of roof decking, you need a permit for this part of the project. Speak to your local municipality for more information.
  • Insurance. Insurance typically covers the cost of replacement due to hail and storm damage. For older roofs, however, any replacement costs may be less than the depreciated age of the roof. Speak to your insurance adjuster about what they may cover.
  • Hiring. Get three quotes from different roofers before hiring. Make sure the written contract provides the materials, costs, and a lien release. Ensure the roofer is licensed and insured in Michigan.
  • Saving tips. You may be able to save money by purchasing the roof material yourself. Roofing in Michigan is best done between spring and fall, but late summer to early fall is the busiest and most expensive time of the year. Replace your roof earlier in the season to save.
  • Rainwater elements. It is common to get new ice shields, rain gutters, and replace elements like the drip edge, fascia, and eaves with your roof. Speak to your roofer about whether these items should be replaced.
  • Dump fees. If the roofer needs to haul debris from the roof replacement, they charge up to $500 in dump fees. You can potentially save this fee by disposing of the material yourself.
  • Grants. Depending on your income level, you may qualify for a grant or loan to help cover the cost of the roof replacement. Speak with your local municipality for more information.
  • Codes. Codes in Michigan dictate the use of certain ice shields and underlayments. They may also dictate the amount and spacing of decking. If your roof is older, your roofer may need to make modifications to bring it up to code. Speak with your roofer if you are unsure whether your roof meets current codes.

FAQs

  • How much does a roof cost per square in Michigan?

The cost of a roof per square ranges from $450 to $2,600 installed in Michigan, depending on the material.

  • How much does it cost to shingle an 1,800 square-foot roof in Michigan?

The cost to shingle an 1,800 sq.ft. roof in Michigan varies depending on the roof’s material and complexity. Costs range from $8,100 to $46,800.

  • How often should you replace your roof in Michigan?

This depends on your roofing material. It must be replaced every 15 to 20 years if it is made of basic asphalt shingles. Architectural shingles, metal roofs, cedar, and slate last longer: 20 to 150 years, depending on the material.

Remodeling Terms Cheat Sheet

Definitions in laymen's terms, cost considerations, pictures and things you need to know.
See full cheat sheet.
glossary term picture Shingle 1 Shingles: A smooth, uniform, flat piece of construction material, available in a wide variety of materials and laid in a series of overlapping rows, used to cover the outside of roofs or walls to protect against weather damage and leaks.
2 Steep slope: Pitch of a roof having a vertical rise of 3 inches or more for every 12 inches of horizontal run
glossary term picture Bitumen 3 Asphalt: A viscous, black mixture of hydrocarbons often used for roofing and waterproofing. It is also used in asphalt for paving roads
4 Underlayment: Roofing material laid underneath roofing tiles to seal the roof, preventing leaks

Cost to replace a roof in Michigan varies greatly by region (and even by zip code). To get free estimates from local contractors, please indicate yours.

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Asphalt shingle roof installed in Michigan with a cat walking on it
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The information provided by our cost guides comes from a great variety of sources, including specialized publications and websites, cost studies, U.S. associations, reports from the U.S. government, contractors and subcontractors, material suppliers, material price services, and other vendor websites. For more information, read our Methodology and sources