How Much Does It Cost to Replace a Roof in New Jersey?

National Average Range:
$8,500 - $17,000
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Reviewed by Nieves Caballero. Written by Fixr.com.

New Jersey homes get a lot of nasty weather each year. From Nor’easters and hurricanes to the occasional tornado, New Jersey roofs can take a beating. If you notice leaks, granules in your gutter, broken and missing shingles, or if you know your current roof is nearing the end of its lifespan, it may be time to consider a roof replacement. Roof replacements can help protect your home from the elements while improving your home’s curb appeal at the same time.

The state average cost to replace a roof in New Jersey is $8,500 to $17,000, with most homeowners paying $13,500 for a 1,700 sq.ft. gable roof replacement with architectural shingles. This project’s low cost is $3,000 for a 1,000 sq.ft. roof replacement with 3-tab asphalt shingles. The high cost is $40,000 for a 2,000 sq.ft. roof replacement with slate tiles and roof deck reinforcement.

Roof Replacement Cost in NJ

New Roof Cost in NJ
National average cost$13,500
Average range$8,500-$17,000
Low-end$3,000
High-end$40,000

Roof Replacement in New Jersey Cost by Project Range

Low
$3,000
1,000 sq.ft. roof replacement with 3-tab asphalt shingles
Average Cost
$13,500
1,700 sq.ft. roof replacement with architectural shingles
High
$40,000
2,000 sq.ft. roof replacement with slate tiles and roof deck reinforcement

Average Roof Replacement Cost in NJ by Size

The average roof size in New Jersey is 1,700 sq.ft., but you may find roofs ranging from 1,000 to 4,000 sq.ft. depending on the home size, shape, and roof complexity. Most roof replacements in New Jersey cost $5 to $10 per sq.ft. or $500 to $1,000 per square. However, the full range of costs, including materials, ranges from $3 to $20 per sq.ft. or $300 to $2,000 per square, with asphalt 1 3-tab shingles 2 being the least expensive and slate 3 tiles costing the most. Below are the average costs to replace a roof in New Jersey based on the most common roof sizes in the state.

Cost to replace a 1,000, 1,200, 1,350, 1,500, 1,700, 2,000, 2,200, 3,750, and 4,500 sq.ft. roof in New Jersey and the US

Cost to replace a 1,000, 1,200, 1,350, 1,500, 1,700, 2,000, 2,200, 3,750, and 4,500 sq.ft. roof in New Jersey and the US

SizeReplacement Cost (New Jersey)Replacement Cost (National Average)
1,000 sq.ft.$3,000 - $20,000$3,500 - $9,000
1,200 sq.ft.$3,600 - $24,000$4,200 - $10,800
1,350 sq.ft.$4,050 - $27,000$4,725 - $12,150
1,500 sq.ft.$4,500 - $30,000$5,250 - $13,500
1,700 sq.ft.$5,100 - $34,000$5,950 - $15,300
2,000 sq.ft.$6,000 - $40,000$7,000 - $18,000
2,200 sq.ft.$6,600 - $44,000$7,700 - $19,800
3,750 sq.ft.$11,250 - $75,000$13,125 - $33,750
4,500 sq.ft.$13,500 - $90,000$15,750 - $40,500

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Cost to Replace a Roof in NJ by Pitch

Your roof’s pitch or slope can also impact the cost of your roof replacement. Flat and low slope roofs use different materials than conventionally sloped roofs, meaning they have different costs. Roofs with a very steep pitch 4 - over 8/12 - may have higher labor costs than conventionally sloped roofs because they can be difficult to work on and may need additional equipment.

Most homes in New Jersey have flat or conventionally sloped roofs, but you can find some low and steep sloped roofs. A conventionally sloped roof rises between 4” and 7” for every 12” horizontally. These roofs can use any material from asphalt shingles to slate without issue. Below are the average costs to replace a roof in New Jersey based on the roof pitch.

Cost per sq.ft. to replace a flat, low slope, conventional slope, and steep slope roof in New Jersey and the US

Cost per sq.ft. to replace a flat, low slope, conventional slope, and steep slope roof in New Jersey and the US

PitchCost per Sq.Ft. (New Jersey)Cost per Sq.Ft. (National Average)
Flat$3 - $7$4.50 - $7
Low Slope$3 - $7$4.50 - $7
Conventional Slope$3 - $20$3.50 - $9
Steep Slope$5 - $20$5 - $12

Cost of Roof Replacement in NJ by Material

The most common roofing materials in New Jersey include asphalt and architectural shingles, tiles, cedar shingles, metal roofs, and slate roofs. Many flat roofs in New Jersey use flat roofing materials like vinyl 5, rubber, and bitumen 1. New Jersey is also one of the bigger investors in solar energy, and residents also have the option of using solar roofing.

Each material has a different set of installation costs for roof replacements. Some materials are more costly than others, while some have higher labor costs. Below are the average costs for a roof replacement per square foot for each material in New Jersey and the U.S.

Cost per sq.ft. to replace a roof in New Jersey and the US by material: vinyl (PVC), bitumen, asphalt shingles…

Cost per sq.ft. to replace a roof in New Jersey and the US by material: vinyl (PVC), bitumen, asphalt shingles…

MaterialCost per Sq.Ft. (New Jersey)Cost per Sq.Ft. (National Average)
Vinyl (PVC)$3 - $5$3 - $8
Bitumen$3 - $5$4 - $8
Asphalt Shingles$3 - $7$3 - $15
Rubber$3 - $7$5 - $13
Cedar$4 - $13$8 - $12
Concrete Tile$7 - $10$4 - $20
Architectural Shingles$7 - $15$3 - $15
Clay$9 - $15$10 - $25
Metal$9 - $17$4 - $40
Slate$10 - $20$1.50 - $30
Solar$15 - $20$21 - $25

Average Cost of Roof Replacement in NJ by Shape

There are many roof types impacting your replacement cost. The most common roof shapes in New Jersey include gable roofs, including cross and Dutch gables, and hipped roofs. However, dormer roofs, mansards, and flat roofs are also fairly common. Hipped roofs cost more because they require more material than gable roofs, meaning that if you have a 2,000 sq.ft. home with a gable roof, the roof is smaller than a 2,000 sq.ft. home with a hipped roof.

Other roof shapes can be more complex, so they cost more per square foot. Mansard roofs and dormer roofs have higher labor costs because they can be difficult to work on. Flat roofs use different materials than other roofs, so they can have different costs. Below are the average costs per square foot for the different roof shapes in New Jersey and the U.S.

Cost per sq.ft. to replace a flat, gable, dutch, hipped, dormer, and mansard roof in New Jersey and the US

ShapeCost per Sq.Ft. (New Jersey)Cost per Sq.Ft. (National Average)
Flat$3 - $7$4.50 - $7
Gable$3 - $20$3.50 - $9
Dutch$3 - $20$3.50 - $9
Hipped$3.50 - $9$3.50 - $9
Dormer$4 - $10$4 - $10
Mansard$5 - $20$8.50 - $25

Roof Replacement Cost Breakdown (New Jersey)

Roof replacement typically consists of the removal of your existing roof and a roof deck inspection before installing the new material. While some materials can be installed over your existing roof, it is usually recommended that a complete roof replacement includes a tear-off. Tear-offs are the most common roofing job in New Jersey because roof overs do not tend to last as long. This ensures there are no issues with your roof deck that must be addressed before the new material can be installed. Some materials like tile and slate are heavy, which may require you to reinforce your roof deck before installing the material, raising the project cost. The exact costs for the tear-off and labor vary depending on your roof’s material, complexity, and what you are installing. Roofers in New Jersey may charge between $40 and $80 per hour for labor, depending on the roof’s complexity and material. The more complex the roof, the higher the labor costs. Below is a cost breakdown for the average roof replacement per square foot.

Roof replacement cost breakdown per sq.ft. in New Jersey: tear-off, material, and installation

Roof replacement cost breakdown per sq.ft. in New Jersey: tear-off, material, and installation

Project AreaCost per Sq.Ft.
Tear-Off (Optional)$1 - $2
Material$1 - $10
Installation$1 - $8

Removing Old Roofing vs Roofing Over in New Jersey

If you have an existing asphalt roof, you may be able to roof over it rather than replace it. Some materials, including asphalt, architectural shingles, and metal roofing, can be installed over a single layer of existing asphalt shingles. This eliminates the cost of the tear-off, saving money. However, this has some considerations and drawbacks. First, you can only roof over once. After that, you need to remove both layers of roofing, increasing the project cost.

You cannot inspect the roof deck in a roof over. If there are issues with the roof deck, you may not be able to see them. Because New Jersey sees inclement weather, you may have mold or wood rot issues that may not be apparent until the tear-off. Roofing over means these issues remain in place and can cause issues.

Your existing shingles must be in fairly good condition to roof over, with no obvious missing areas or significant deterioration. Roof overs are not recommended in New Jersey, and most roofing jobs involve a tear-off. If you install tile, slate, or another type of roofing, it is recommended that you do not roof over but remove the existing roof.

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Enhancement and Improvement Costs

Skylight Replacement

If your roof has a skylight, you may want to consider replacing the skylight with the roof. To replace a skylight, the roofing material around it must be removed and replaced after the skylight is installed. This makes a roof replacement a good time to replace the skylight because the labor costs less and saves money. The average cost of a skylight replacement is $800 to $2,200.

Cost to Redeck a Roof

If you install a heavy material like tile or slate or your roof deck is in poor condition, you may need to redeck your roof during the roof replacement. This increases the project cost but ensures your roof is stronger and lasts longer. The cost to redeck varies depending on if you redeck all or a few sections. The average cost is $4,000 to $5,000 for the entire roof.

Additional Considerations and Costs

  • Permits. Permits are not required in New Jersey for roofing or siding jobs. This means you do not need a permit for a roof replacement, but you may need one for other jobs. Speak to your local municipality for more information.
  • Insurance. Insurance may cover the cost of roof replacement if the damage was due to a storm or hail. It does not cover replacement costs for an old roof. Check with your insurance company if you suspect storm damage and schedule an inspection.
  • Hiring. Interview at least three contractors before hiring. Get your contract in writing, with a breakdown of materials, costs, and a lien release. Ensure the contractor you hire is fully licensed and insured in New Jersey.
  • Saving tips. Costs are highest in New Jersey during the late summer and fall months. Replacing your roof in other seasons may save money. You may also save by purchasing the material yourself.
  • Rainwater elements. It is common to replace things like gutters, flashing 6, eaves 7, and fascia with your roof. This increases your project cost but can improve the roof’s appearance and function.
  • Dump fees. Depending on the material you remove, you may have fees associated with disposal. Some roof materials can be recycled, while others cannot. Disposal fees add $50 to $200 to your project cost.
  • Grants. There may be loans and grants available in New Jersey for single-family home repairs and roof replacements. Contact your local municipality to see if you qualify.
  • Codes. If your roof is older, you may find that it needs additional work to bring it to current state and federal building codes. Speak to your contractor about what work may need to be done for your roof.

FAQs

  • How long do roofs last in NJ?

A roof’s longevity in New Jersey depends on the material. Asphalt roofs last 15 to 20 years, metal roofs last 50 to 100, and slate roofs last up to 200 years.

  • What is the labor cost to install a roof in NJ?

Labor costs for roofing installation in New Jersey start at $1 to $8 per sq.ft. but may be higher for some materials or complex installations.

  • How often should you replace your roof in NJ?

This depends on your roofing material. An asphalt roof may need to be replaced every 15 to 20 years, while some slate, tile, and metal roofs may last 100 years or more.

  • How much does a metal roof cost in NJ?

A metal roof typically costs $18,000 to $34,000 for a 2,000 sq.ft. roof in New Jersey.

Remodeling Terms Cheat Sheet

Definitions in laymen's terms, cost considerations, pictures and things you need to know.
See full cheat sheet.
glossary term picture Bitumen 1 Asphalt: (Also known as Bitumen) A viscous, black mixture of hydrocarbons often used for roofing and waterproofing. It is also used in asphalt for paving roads
glossary term picture Shingle 2 Shingles: A smooth, uniform, flat piece of construction material, available in a wide variety of materials and laid in a series of overlapping rows, used to cover the outside of roofs or walls to protect against weather damage and leaks.
glossary term picture Slate 3 Slate: A fine-grained rock, typically bluish-gray in color, that can easily be split into thin layers and is commonly used as a roofing material
4 Steep pitch: Pitch of a roof having a vertical rise of 3 inches or more for every 12 inches of horizontal run
glossary term picture Vinyl 5 Vinyl: A synthetic plastic made from ethylene and chlorine. Vinyl has many applications in the construction industry and it is widely used in sidings, window frames, roofing and gutters, among others
glossary term picture Flashing 6 Flashing: Pieces of sheet metal used on roofs to cover joints, such as where the roof meets the wall, or around a chimney or skylight, to protect them and prevent water leaking through
7 Eaves: The edge of a roof that connects with the wall of the building. Usually this part of the roof comes out further than the wall

Cost to replace a roof in New Jersey varies greatly by region (and even by zip code). To get free estimates from local contractors, please indicate yours.

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Architectural shingle roof installed in a townhouse in New Jersey
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The information provided by our cost guides comes from a great variety of sources, including specialized publications and websites, cost studies, U.S. associations, reports from the U.S. government, contractors and subcontractors, material suppliers, material price services, and other vendor websites. For more information, read our Methodology and sources