How Much Does It Cost to Build a Home Gym?

Low
$500
Average Cost
$4,000
High
$28,000
(building a home gym in a basement with foam flooring and multiple stations)

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How Much Does It Cost to Build a Home Gym?

Low
$500
Average Cost
$4,000
High
$28,000
(building a home gym in a basement with foam flooring and multiple stations)

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Reviewed by Nieves Caballero. Written by Fixr.com.

If you exercise regularly or you’d like to start, having a gym at home can be a convenient and cost-saving way to do so. While you can always join a gym or get a gym membership, these can be expensive and limiting in terms of the times of day and how often you may want to work out. With a home gym, you can exercise on your schedule, and, if you use your equipment regularly, it will eventually pay for itself in saved gym membership fees. Every home gym is different depending on the type of exercise you do and the amount of space you plan to allocate for it. This can lead to a wide range of associated costs as well.

Building a home gym costs, on average, $1,000 to $10,000 with the average homeowner spending around $4,000 on a home gym setup in the basement with foam flooring and multiple stations.

Home Gym Price

Home Gym Cost
National average cost$4,000
Average range$1,000 - $10,000
Minimum cost$500
Maximum cost$28,000


Home Gym Cost by Project Range

Low
$500
Home gym setup in existing room with bodyweight equipment
Average Cost
$4,000
Building a home gym in a basement with foam flooring and multiple stations
High
$28,000
Home addition for gym with rubber flooring, functional training equipment

Home Gym vs Gym Membership

Both home gyms and gym memberships can have a wide range of costs. Basic gym memberships start at around $10 a month, while more elaborate gyms can have fees up to $100 a monthHome gyms can have very simple setups with mats and straps for under $100, or you can purchase a full set of equipment for thousands.

In general, if you use it regularly, a home gym will eventually pay for itself in saved gym membership fees. The real benefit of a gym membership comes from things like versatility and differences in equipment, as well as in the other benefits like spas, classes, and instruction.

In the following costs, the price of assembly is included, however, the costs of adding rubber flooring or adequate lighting are not included.


Home gym vs. gym memebership cost




Total Cost at End of One YearTotal Cost at End of Five Years
Basic Home Gym$175$175
Elaborate Home Gym$2,500$2,500
Basic Gym Membership$120$600
Premium Gym Membership$1,200$6,000


Consult with a pro when building a home gym


Starting a Home Gym

While it’s entirely possible to tackle the building of a home gym all at once, many people find that this isn’t necessarily the best method.

Start Small

Before you start buying equipment, be realistic with yourself about how much of it you will use and how often. If you’ve been working out regularly for years, you’ll know the types of equipment that you use most often and what will make the most sense. But if you’re just starting out, you may not realize what will really work best for you at home. So begin slowly, purchase pieces of equipment one at a time, and make sure that you’re getting the right amount of use from them before you move on.

Be Realistic About Your Budget

It’s possible to spend tens of thousands of dollars on gym equipment. It’s also possible to purchase a lot of very cheap equipment that doesn’t perform the way you need it to, so you end up spending even more money replacing it. If you start slowly and pay attention to quality, you should be able to budget for single items at a time, going for quality over quantity, to get the best results. For example, you can purchase a high-end elliptical machine that will be heavy and difficult to move, with bells and whistles you may never use. You can also purchase a very cheap machine that doesn’t track your time or distance and won’t hold a lot of weight. By opting for a quality machine that will give you what you want, you may find a better option with fewer bells and whistles, but still equipped with the functions you need.

Where to Build a Home Gym

Most homes have a variety of spaces that you can use to set up your home gym. Each will have some pros and cons, though, so think carefully before you start moving in your heavy equipment.

Basement

Many home gyms are in the basement. It’s out of the way and the concrete flooring is unlikely to be damaged by a dropped dumbbell. However, if you go for this option, make sure you have good ventilation and possibly a dehumidifier. Basements can be damp and humid, which means you may find it harder to work out there on a warm day, and your equipment may rust over time.

You won’t need to do much work in a basement gym; flooring, lights, and equipment are your only real needs. A rubber floor and some recessed lighting 1 are all that’s really necessary to convert the room, but a dehumidifier is another almost universal requirement. The cost to convert the space, without equipment, can be done for around $2,000 with flooring, without the added equipment costs. If you choose to stay on the concrete, it can cost less than $1,000 for lighting and dehumidifying.

Attics

If you have attic space, make sure that the floor is strong enough to hold heavy equipment. Not every attic is built with a strong subfloor 2. Also make sure that you have enough space to stand up and move around safely. Guidelines for home gyms dictate that you need 20-50 square feet of space for free weights and up to 200 square feet if you have multiple stations.

Attic conversions tend to be a little more expensive because you will need to put in a subfloor and a finished floor over it, plus put in lights. You’ll also need to make sure that you have good access, which may mean remodeling the stairs as well. All together, you can expect an attic conversion to cost around $3,000-$5,000 before equipment.

Spare Bedroom

This is another good option if you want your home gym to be easily accessible, but out of the way. Spare bedrooms are often large enough to handle multiple stations, and usually have the right type of subflooring. Just keep in mind that if you put a bed or furniture in the room, it will cut down on your space, and if you have guests staying, it can mean giving up access to your equipment. Removing the bed and furniture frees up space, but can mean having to forego having guests.

Spare bedroom conversions are usually the least expensive. Carpeting is not recommended as the best flooring material, but it can be left in place if you’re on a budget, or using the room as a guest room as well. If you have wood flooring, you will want to cover it with rubber tiles 3, at least in the area you’re working out, which can have costs between $500 and $1,000.

Addition

If you don’t have enough room for a home gym in your existing home, you can add an addition to accommodate one. This is the most expensive option, so you should only consider doing this if you know your gym will get a lot of use, or the addition will be housing other things like a guest bedroom or kitchen expansion as well.

With an addition, you can customize the space to suit your needs. This can mean putting in the type of flooring and lighting you like best, for example, or getting the exact dimensions and amount of space you really want.;

Additions can be expensive, with costs around $23,000 for a fully finished addition, without the added equipment costs.

Luxury home gym with recessed lighting, foam tile flooring, a tv, and multiple stations


Home Gym Lighting

Whenever possible, make use of any natural light that the space you’re building your home gym in has. Natural light is perfect for most home gyms and will work well for many spaces.

If you’re building your gym in an area that doesn’t have much natural light, or if you want to use the space when it’s dark outside, you will need to make sure you have the right amount and type of light.

There are no hard and fast guidelines, but there are a few recommendations when it comes to illuminating a home gym. The first is to choose lights that don’t get hot or add heat to the room. Exercise can be hot enough on its own without your lights warming you up. The second is that the lights should not get in the way, particularly for tall equipment or in rooms with lower ceilings. Recessed lights, therefore, make good choices for most home gyms.

Finally, consider putting your lights on a dimmer. This will allow you to dim the lights for some types of workouts and turn them up to full brightness for others, giving your gym the best illumination. The cost to add 6 recessed lights to a room is around $780, plus $50 for a dimmer switch.​


Home Gym Flooring

While you can technically work out on nearly anything, a good home gym should provide you some traction for your shoes, as well as some degree of impact resistance and resilience. There are a few different flooring materials that work well for home gyms, the best, however, is rubber. A rubber floor can be done in tiles or rolled out in sections, and it comes in varying thicknesses. It costs between $2 and $150 a square foot, depending on quality and type of installation.

Foam tiles are an inexpensive option that you can quickly install over many existing floors including hardwood, tile, and concrete. They cost between $0.50 and $5 a square foot on average, and can usually be put down yourself, saving installation costs.

Vinyl flooring is a good option if the gym will have another use, such as a spare bedroom. It’s tough and resilient enough to handle most workouts, but can still be attractive. It costs between $2 and $8 a square foot.

If you’re on a budget, and need a versatile floor, carpeting can also work, but it isn’t usually recommended because it’s not always non-skid. It costs between $7 and $12 a square foot for a mid-grade carpet.

All-in-one Home Gyms Cost

One space-saving option that a lot of people choose is the all-in-one home gym. These are machines that will allow you to work various body areas and muscle groups on one machine. They don’t take up as much space as multiple stations, and can give you a total body workout at home. There are two basic types of all-in-one gyms: resistance and bodyweight.

Resistance

Resistance machines are adjustable, allowing you to increase or decrease the amount of resistance as needed. The resistance may be provided by bands or by weights, so it’s a great way to increase your workout as you progress. This type of gym may have a steeper learning curve, however, not only for using each exercise, but also for setting up the starting resistance level. Some types of resistance machines that use bands may also break more easily over time. All-in-one resistance home gyms have a wide range of costs, mostly due to the number of features. The more features it has, the higher the cost. It is not uncommon to find a range of prices starting at $250 and going as high as $2,950.

Bodyweight

Bodyweight all-in-one gyms have fewer moving parts, and allow you to use your own weight for resistance. To make the exercises easier or harder, you change or modify your position. With fewer moving parts, there’s less potential for things breaking or wearing out, and often less of a learning curve. On the other hand, it can be difficult to measure progress, because you’ll need to subtly adjust your body as you grow stronger, rather than simply increasing weight or resistance.

Keep in mind that many bodyweight home gyms can add resistance, either through adjustable bands or by adding your own weights, so they can be adjustable over time, but that may require additional materials or purchases. All-in-one bodyweight home gyms have a wide range of costs. It is not uncommon to find a range of prices starting at $300 and going as high as $500.


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Home Gym for Small Spaces

If you don’t have the space to put in a total gym, there are numerous small space equipment packages that can give you a total body workout. In addition, it’s also possible to purchase many smaller components such as adjustable dumbbells or resistance bands that can allow you to get a good workout at home. You might also invest in pull-up bars and straps for bodyweight workouts.

Gym Equipment Cost by Type of Training

It’s possible to use a wide range of different types of equipment for any type of training that you may prefer to do. Some exercises and equipment types better lend themselves to one type of exercise over another, but there can be a lot of crossover. Below, you’ll find the costs and some recommendations for various types of equipment broken down by training type. Keep in mind that these may not be all the different equipment types available for each training style, and are only recommendations. Ultimately, each piece of equipment that will work for you will be dependent on budget, space, ability, body type, and your personal goals.


Consult with a pro when buying gym equipment


Bodyweight/Calisthenics Equipment Cost

If you prefer bodyweight training or basic calisthenics, there are several pieces of equipment you may want to invest in. All together, it is possible to purchase equipment for this type of home gym for costs starting at $125.


EquipmentAverage Starting Cost
Ab wheel$15
Ab mat$20
Speed rope$20
Rings$30
Pull-up bar$40


Pull-up Bar Cost

Pull-up bars can be useful for hanging rings or straps, or for simple exercises such as pull-ups and chin-ups. They can either be screwed directly into a wall or be installed in a doorway using a tension rod. Costs start around $40. One of the commonly purchased pull-up bar types is a doorway pull-up bar. It has multiple hand grips and positions, so you can work different muscle groups and find the pull-up method that works best for you. It has foam hand grips and can be used in a variety of ways to get in a full body workout.

Calisthenics Rings Price

Rings are a great addition to any home gym. You can attach them to your ceiling or hang them from a pull-up bar. They allow you to do a lot of different bodyweight exercises and gymnastic moves at home. A set of basic rings costs around $30. One of the prefered mateirals for home gym calisthenics rings is heavy duty plastic.

Ab Wheel Cost

An ab wheel is an easy way to strengthen your abs. As you kneel and grip the wheel, you push it slowly away from you, then contract your abs to pull yourself back to the starting position. Ab wheels can have a range of features and costs, which start around $15. They normally have ergonomic handles to make gripping and sliding easier. It is recommended to use a knee pad for better comfort during use.

Ab Mat Cost

Ab mats are thick, curved mats designed to flex the spine, so you need to bend backwards over them and then flex the abdominal muscles to pull yourself up. They come in different shapes and configurations, with some which are thicker and denser than others. They have starting costs between $20 and $30, depending on the size of the mat.

Speed Rope Price

A speed rope or jump rope designed for fast, indoor use is also a good addition to your home gym. Speed ropes tend to be lightweight and have handles for easier gripping. They have costs starting around $20.

Weightlifting Equipment Price

Weightlifting in a home gym can look a lot like weightlifting at a traditional gym, or it can be made up of a variety of smaller pieces. There are many different types of weights that you may want to invest in, all of which can help you target different areas of your body. You can purchase a basic setup of weightlifting equipment for costs between $850 and $1,180.


EquipmentAverage Starting Costs
Barbell clips$15-$40
Medicine balls$20-$40
Dumbbell$20-$50
Kettlebells$20-$200
Bench$50
Plates$150
Barbell$250
Squat rack$300-$400


Barbell Price

A barbell is a long, metal pole that is meant to hold plates on the ends. Each plate has a different weight and by adding and removing weights you can make the barbell heavier or lighter. There are different types depending on the type of lifting you wish to do. A barbell that could be used for squats, benching, and deadlifts has costs starting around $250.

Weightlifting Plates Price

Plates are the weights that you stack on the sides of the barbell, although it is possible to use them individually as well, such as holding them to the body while doing abdominal exercises. They come in a range of sizes from 3 pounds up to 25 pounds or more. It’s common to need a range of sizes to allow you to customize your workout. Plates are sold individually or in pairs, with costs starting at $150 on average.

Barbell Spring Clips or Collars Cost

To use a barbell and plates, you need to have either clips or collars, which hold the plates onto the ends of the barbell and keep them from slipping off. There are a variety of types, and determining which kind works best for you mostly comes down to personal preference. Sometimes a specific barbell will need specific clips, so it is best to purchase them together. They cost between $15 and $40 a set.

Squat Rack Price

A squat rack can help you safely squat using a barbell and plates. The rack allows you to smoothly move the bar up and down, shifting it onto the rack when you want to stop. They have costs starting around $300-$400. In some models, you can add an optional lat pull down attachment, making it an even more versatile piece of equipment that can grow with your over time.

Dumbbells Price

Dumbbells are hand weights of different sizes. They’re meant for working smaller muscles in the arms and upper body and are designed for one weight to be held in each hand. They start around 1 pound in weight and go up as high as 50 pounds in some cases. You can purchase them in sets of two at the weights you need, or purchase full sets that can accommodate different needs as you progress. They start around $2-$50 for a set of two; full sets of dumbbells cost around $300 or more, depending on how many pieces are in the set.

Kettlebells Price

Kettlebells are round weights with a looped handle on top. They can be lifted, curled, or swung, held in one hand or in two, and they offer more versatility for certain types of weightlifting than dumbbells. They come in the same sizes as dumbbells, but you purchase them singularly rather than in pairs or sets. They can cost anywhere from $20-$200, depending on the size and weight.

Gym Bench Price

With a bench, you can use a squat rack to bench press. You can also use the bench with dumbbells and barbells, as well as for some bodyweight workouts. Benches come in many configurations; some are flat, while others are inclined, and some will be able to move positions. They have starting costs around $50 for a basic bench.

Medicine Balls Price

Medicine balls are weighted balls with a rough surface for gripping. They can be tossed or held, depending on the movement and body area you are working on. They come in different sizes and weights, and it’s possible to purchase just one or a set. Each ball costs between $20 and $50 on average.

Cardio Equipment Cost

Cardio equipment comes in many different forms. Some people choose not to include cardio in their home gym, opting instead to run or bike outside, but for others it may be better to choose equipment that can be used indoors. It’s common with cardio to choose a single piece of equipment for the home gym, which can have costs anywhere from $20-$1,570, depending on your needs.


EquipmentAverage Starting Costs
Speed rope$20
Step platform/plyo box$50
Battle ropes$100
Heavy bag$150
Rowing machine$250
Exercise bike$300
Elliptical$300
Treadmill$400


Exercise Bike Price

Exercise bikes come in a wide range of types. They can be recumbent, where you lean back, or upright, such as the type used in a spin class. They can include fans, which can help cool the air as you peddle, or they can be very simple resistance wheels. Some have hand pedals and others have arms to push for a total body cardio workout. Exercise bikes start around $300 for a basic, recumbent bike.

Battle Ropes Price

Battle ropes are heavy ropes you loop onto a stationary bar or heavy object. You take the ends of the ropes and move them in waves to strengthen the arms while getting a cardio workout. The average cost of a set of ropes is around $75.

Heavy Bag Price

Boxing or kickboxing is a way to get in cardio along with some bodybuilding at the same time. A heavy bag can be hung from the ceiling or it can be stationary, standing on its own. They come in different sizes and materials, and some may be firmer than others. They have costs starting around $150.

Air Rower/Rowing Machine Cost

Rowing machines provide cardio through a combination of lower and upper body motion. They typically have a sliding seat and a chain or pulley that turns either a fan or a tub of water, but some space-saving and economical models come with a stationary seat and a set of handles that move against different resistances. The latter may be a good option for people with lower body mobility problems. Simple rowing machines start at $250.

Elliptical Machine Price

Ellipticals are a good way to get cardio without impact, but while still weight bearing. They consist of a set of pedals plus a set of levers you push with your arms. They can have a lot of programs and settings, or have very simple resistance caused by pulleys inside. They can also come in many sizes, which can mean they have a wide range of costs, usually starting around $300.

Speed Rope Price

A speed rope is a lightweight jump rope that can allow you to get quick cardio anywhere at any time. They’re made of a lightweight cable with two handles, which are usually made for comfort. They have starting costs of around $20. This type of rope is designed to help you master the double under. The average cable is 10 feet long, but adjustable so if you need to shorten it, you can.

Treadmill Price

If you want to walk or run indoors, then a treadmill is a good choice. Treadmills can be powered or be simply a belt on a set of rollers that you move yourself. They can have a lot of settings and rise into inclines or they can be flat. With so many options, they have a wide range of costs, starting at around $400. Some models offer multiple preset courses and settings. They can also have an interactive touch screen where you can keep track of your stats while you run so you can make sure you’re hitting your goals.

Step Platform/Plyo Box Cost

If you want to have a very simple way to do some cardio that doesn’t require a machine or moving parts, you can purchase a step platform. Platforms can be solid with a handle for support or they can be made of different pieces so you can raise and lower the height as you need it. They have costs starting around $50.

Functional Training Equipment Cost

Functional training is sometimes known as cross-training. It works a variety of different parts of the body through stations, and may involve a combination of bodyweight, resistance, and cardio training. You won’t necessarily need every piece of equipment to do this type of training, but a good assortment of equipment is necessary, so expect to pay between $1,500 and $2,000 on average. In addition to the equipment described below, you may also want to include some other items featured in sections above, including speed ropes, rings, barbells, plates, barbell clips and collars, step platforms, rowing machines, stationary bikes, and/or treadmills.


EquipmentAverage Starting Costs
Barbell clips$15-$40
Speed rope$20
Medicine balls$20-$50
Kettlebells$20-$200
Rings$30
Step platform/Plyo box$50
Battle ropes$100
Barbell$150
Plates$150
Rowing machine$250
Stationary bike$300
Treadmill$400
Squat rack with pull-up bar$500


Battle Ropes Price

Battle ropes are heavy ropes you loop onto a stationary bar or heavy object or bolt to the ground. You take the ends of the ropes and move them in waves to strengthen the arms while getting a cardio workout. The average cost of a set of ropes is around $100. Usually, they come with an anchoring set, so you can screw them down to your floor for the most stability and best use.

Kettlebells Price

Kettlebells are round weights with a looped handle on top. They can be lifted, curled, or swung, held in one hand or in two, and they offer more versatility for certain types of weightlifting than dumbbells. They come in the same sizes as dumbbells, but you purchase them singularly rather than in pairs or sets. They can cost anywhere from $20-$200, depending on the size and weight.

Medicine Balls Price

Medicine balls are weighted balls with a rough surface for gripping. They can be tossed or held, depending on the movement and body area you are working on. They come in different sizes and weights, and it’s possible to purchase just one or a set. Each ball costs between $20 and $50 on average.


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TRX/Pilates Equipment Price

TRX and Pilates are types of bodyweight exercises that can use a lot of different equipment to help you achieve your goals. A full set of equipment can cost $160-$190 altogether. Along with the equipment below, you may also want to include a set of dumbbells, described in the Weightlifting section above.


EquipmentAverage Starting Costs
Stability ball$20
Exercise mat$20
Dumbbells$20-$50
TRX Suspension kit$100


TRX Kit Price

This is a set of adjustable straps with handles and loops at the bottom. You will need either a pull-up bar, ring, or something else to hang them from. You use the straps in a variety of ways to exercise your entire body at once. The strap set can be purchased for around $100. Most models include suspension straps, a workout guide, and the ability to be hung from multiple places, including from a door or ceiling.

Stability Ball Price

A stability ball is a great addition to many home gyms. These are large, inflatable balls that you can sit or lean on to do a lot of different abdominal exercises. They come in many sizes and a range of costs, starting around $20 but running as high as over $100. Most models are anti-slip and anti-burst for safety, and they come with a pump, as well as a booklet of exercises to help get you started.

Exercise Mat Price

Sometimes called a yoga mat, this is a cushioned mat you can use to increase your grip on the floor or to provide a cushioned surface to kneel or lay on. They have costs starting at around $20, and the thicker the mat, the higher the costs will likely be. Some models fold up into thirds to make it easier to stack and put away when you’re done with it.
Yoga/flexibility Equipment Cost

Yoga and flexibility training don’t need as much equipment as other types of exercise. You can often get by with just a few things and add to them as needed. You can get a full setup for around $50-$60 to start.


EquipmentAverage Starting Costs
Blocks$10
Yoga mat$20
Straps$20-$30


Yoga Mat Price

This is a type of exercise mat marketed toward yoga. It’s a cushioned mat you can use to increase your grip on the floor or to provide a cushioned surface to kneel or lay on. Costs start around $20, and the thicker the mat, the higher the costs will likely be. Some models absorb sweat to keep you from sliding around during your workout and provides a really sleek and easy-to-clean surface when you’re done. It’s thin and ideal for hard surfaces and areas where you need good stability underfoot.

Straps Cost

Straps are sometimes needed in yoga if you have difficulty with flexibility and are working your way up. They can be smooth or adjustable, and some may also provide resistance. Straps start around $15. No matter what level of Yogi you are, you can find a use for a strap, you can use it for positioning, stretching, or when you simply cannot reach.

Yoga Blocks Price

Blocks can help you with stability or reach, particularly if you are just starting out on your yoga journey. They’re soft and lightweight, but able to hold a person’s weight if needed. They cost around $10. Normally they are sold in a set of two. They can be made of cork or foam. However heavier and sturdier than foam blocks, which can be beneficial for beginners.


Home Gym Assembly Services


Most large pieces of home gym equipment are shipped unassembled. And while some people are confident with their DIY skills and can put them together themselves, others may find the task too complicated. In that case, you can hire home gym assembly services to put the equipment together for you. Different pieces of equipment may have different costs, depending on the complexity of the piece. Some services charge by the piece of equipment, others by the hour, with more complex equipment costing more to install than simple equipment.

EquipmentAverage Assembly Cost
Bench$50-$60
Squat rack$70-$90
Stationary bike$90-$150
Rowing machine$90-$150
Elliptical$100-$175
Treadmill$125-$200


Pros and Cons of a Home Gym

There are a lot of things to consider when building a home gym, many of them positive, but with a few drawbacks as well. Having a home gym means that you can get a workout at any time. You don’t have to drive, waste gas, or wait for the gym to be open, so if you want to work out early, late, or on holidays you have that option. And while you do have set up costs, you don’t have ongoing fees like in a professional gym.

There are drawbacks, however. A home gym will rarely have the variety and type of equipment that you’ll find in a professional gym. This can mean that your workouts can get old and stale more quickly and that you have to keep investing in more and more equipment. If you find that you aren’t using the equipment regularly, then it will be taking up valuable space in your home that could be used for other things.

Outdoor vs. Indoor Home Gym

While most people think of a home gym as being indoors, it is possible to get exercise outdoors as well. Most typical home gym equipment is not suited to the outdoors, so if you want to work out outside, you will need to consider other equipment, such as basketball hoops or courts, tennis nets or courts, and swimming pools.

Small outdoor gyms, such as a hoop in the driveway, don’t take up as much valuable space as an indoor gym, but they are often less versatile. With the exception of having portable gym equipment and the ability to take it outdoors, most people find that an indoor gym gets more use and is generally less expensive. Having a single basketball hoop installed can be done for around $450, while a tennis net installation can cost around $500 for a double braided net, professionally installed.


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Enhancement and Improvement Costs

Weighted Vest Cost

If you want to make your home workouts more challenging, you can opt to wear a weighted vest. This burns more calories in all your movements due to the added weight. A weighted vest costs around $40.

Foam Roller Cost

Foam rollers are a good thing to have in a home gym. They allow you to stretch out tight muscles and may help with injury recovery. They have a range of costs and sizes, with most starting around $30 for a basic roller.

Additional Considerations and Costs

  • Another option is the portable gym. These consist of many pieces that can be packed up into a bag or kit that you can carry with you to your workplace, outside, or on vacation. They have starting costs of around $100.
  • Sometimes you may be able to get good quality gym equipment second-hand on places such as Craig’s List or eBay. This is because many people who purchase equipment and don’t use it may want to try to recoup some of their costs.
  • If you’re building an addition for your home gym, finishing a basement or attic, or making any other major changes to your home or property, you will need to pull a permit first. Speak to your town hall before you begin to find out more.
  • Keep in mind when purchasing some equipment, such as barbells, that there are different sizes and weights for men and women. An Olympic weight bar, for example is 7-feet long and weighs roughly 45 pounds on its own. Bars made for women are closer to 5-feet long and weigh 20 pounds.
  • There are many parts of a home gym you can DIY, including power racks, reverse hyper machines, plate holders, and strap and suspension systems.

FAQ

  • Is having a home gym worth it?

This depends on how often you think you would use it. If you use it frequently, then it can pay for itself in saved membership fees.

  • What do I need for a home gym?

This depends on what it is you want to do. Most people get an assortment of equipment including some cardio, weights, and resistance training.

  • Does a home gym add value?

Not usually, because most of the value is in the equipment, and this can be taken with you when you go.

  • How much does it cost to install a home gym?

Home gyms have a wide range of costs, but most people find they spend around $4,000 on the setup.

  • Is a home gym a good investment?

It can be a good investment if you use it regularly, because it will pay for itself over time with saved gym fees.

  • How much should I spend on a home gym?

This will depend on the type of setup you are creating. Most people spend around $4,000 on a home gym.

  • When is the best time to buy gym equipment?

With the exception of January, any time is usually good. Keep an eye out for sales, as these can happen throughout the year.

  • Should I buy the cheapest equipment I can find?

Not necessarily. Some cheap equipment won’t have the features you need or it may break easily or not last as long.

  • How long will it take to get my return on investment?

This depends on the type of equipment and how expensive your gym fees are. If you use it regularly, you can find that it will pay for itself in just a few years.

Remodeling Terms Cheat Sheet

Definitions in laymen's terms, cost considerations, pictures and things you need to know.
See full cheat sheet.
1 Recessed lighting: A type of recessed lighting where the light is installed into a hole in the ceiling, giving downward light.
glossary term picture Subfloor 2 Subfloor: The bottom-most layer of a floor, supported by joists, over which finished flooring material is laid
glossary term picture Kid Tile 3 Rubber tiles: Soft interlocking tiles, usually made of rubber, used as a safe flooring for children's playground areas

Cost to build a gym varies greatly by region (and even by zip code). To get free estimates from local contractors, please indicate yours.

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The information provided by our cost guides comes from a great variety of sources, including specialized publications and websites, cost studies, U.S. associations, reports from the U.S. government, contractors and subcontractors, material suppliers, material price services, and other vendor websites. For more information, read our Methodology and sources
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Cost to build a gym varies greatly by region (and even by zip code). To get free estimates from local contractors, please indicate yours.

The information provided by our cost guides comes from a great variety of sources, including specialized publications and websites, cost studies, U.S. associations, reports from the U.S. government, contractors and subcontractors, material suppliers, material price services, and other vendor websites. For more information, read our Methodology and sources