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Addition Framing Cost

Addition Framing Cost

National average
$2,500
(200 sq.ft. addition, moderately complex wood-frame addition with taller windows)
Low: $1,800

(simple wood-frame addition with no special features)

High: $4,000

(moderately complex ICF frame addition with high ceilings)

Cost to frame an addition varies greatly by region (and even by zip code).
Get free estimates from Carpenters in your city.

The average cost to frame an addition is $2,500.

In this guide

Why your frame is important
Framing material
Framing process
Labor costs
Enhancement and improvement costs
Additional considerations and costs
FAQ

How much does it cost to frame an addition?

If you are planning an addition to your home, you probably know that the project will go forward in stages, and that each stage has a timeframe and cost. After the planning and drawing stages of your addition, the first major component that lets you see how your addition is taking shape is the framing.

Framing is the building of the structure for your addition. It is the rough construction that the rest of the finish work will be done on. Framing is necessary regardless of which material you choose, what it will look like, and what size and shape it will be. These different factors contribute to the costs for the framing of an addition, which means there is a range of associated costs. The average wooden stud-wall frame construction for an addition runs between $9 and $18 a square foot, or $1,800 and $3,600 for a 200-square-foot addition, with most homeowners spending around $2,500 on basic rough construction framing.

Addition framing costs

Addition framing costs
National average cost$9/sq.ft.
Average range$9 to $18/sq.ft.
Minimum cost$12.50/sq.ft.
Maximum cost$20/sq.ft.


Why your frame is important

The frame makes up roughly 18% of your total project for the addition. It may not feel as important or interesting as choosing the finish materials, but it is actually one of the most important parts of your new addition.

The frame is the initial structure of your addition. It is the skeleton that the rest of the addition is built on. Without a wood, steel, or insulated concrete forms (ICF) block frame, you would have nothing to build your finished addition on. Therefore, making sure that your frame is of good condition and is erected properly will ensure that the rest of your addition can proceed smoothly, and your new addition will be structurally sound once it is complete.

Framing material

Three basic framing materials may used to build your addition. Wood is the most common for residential additions, while some commercial structures use steel. The newcomer to the game that many home and business owners are beginning to adopt for their frames is ICF. All three have pros and cons when it comes to building your addition.

Wood is the least expensive, coming in between $9 and $18 a square foot. Steel starts at around $14 a square foot and goes as high as $36, depending on the type of structure. ICF is in the middle, costing between $11 and $20 a square foot on average.

Wood construction goes up fairly quickly and is easily sourced. It is also simple to find a contractor who knows wood, so you will have an easy time finding someone to build your frame.

Steel is more durable and more capable of being used for larger, heavier structures, which is why it is more commonly used in commercial settings. It can be difficult to find a contractor who works with steel for residential additions, and in most cases, the added strength is not necessary.

ICF blocks are becoming more common because they offer the chance to build a house frame that is insulated against thermal transfer and sound. They are easy to build with, but depending on where you are, you may have a hard time locating them or finding a contractor who is familiar with them.

Framing process

The framing process varies depending on your location and the type of framing material. Wood frames are typically built after pouring the foundation, erecting the skeleton of the walls, and framing out the windows and doors. Some framers also frame out the roof and any trusses 1 that may be used to bear loads. Interior framing puts up the skeletons of the walls, but these are not finished until a later date when the plumbing and electrical work is complete.

In some areas, the framers may go a step further, putting up the final outdoor walls and roof and installing house wrap and any exterior insulation. Framers do not do any further work indoors.

When using steel, the process is similar, although it may take longer. There is also less finish work done outdoors.

ICF blocks are used primarily on the exterior walls, so interior framing of walls is done separately, usually with lumber. Because the exterior walls are finished minus the siding, once the walls are erected, the frame is considered complete.

Labor costs

Labor costs for building a frame run around $4 to $10 a square foot for a lumber-based frame. Costs can be higher for steel and ICF, with steel running around $10 to $15 a square foot and ICF labor around $5 to $11 a square foot. This involves the construction of the addition’s exterior and interior walls as well as any minor exterior finishing, such as installing a house wrap. This makes the labor between $800 and $2,000 for a 200-square-foot wood frame addition, with most people paying around $950 for labor out of the total of $2,500.

Enhancement and improvement costs

Building Wrap

Building wrap, also called house wrap, is installed over the exterior of the frame before the siding is installed. It is sometimes paired with insulation as well. Some framers install this, depending on the area. It costs around $1 a square foot installed.

Window Installation

The frame is made to accommodate windows and doors in the design. Some framers take the additional step to install the windows themselves. New windows cost around $1,230 each for a set of three wood windows.

Additional considerations and costs

  • When working with a general contractor, they will likely have their own framing crew. This means that you will not need to hire framers on your own.
  • If you are acting as the project manager for your addition, research framing companies, including reading reviews and asking for references. Make sure all details are spelled out in the contracts and that you get a lien release in the contract for safety.
  • To make sure that your framing costs do not increase, settle on your building plan before you begin because changes to the plan will cause costs to rise.
  • Complex additions and plans cost more to frame than simple plans. Added intersecting walls and slopes take more materials and time to build, increasing the price.
  • Walls are most frequently built on the ground, and then raised into place. This helps ensure better precision to eliminate issues later on.
  • If you include special details, such as high ceilings, tall windows, or added soffits, your costs will be higher.
  • Roof framing is sometimes considered a separate cost at around $6 to $9 a square foot. You may need to contract this separately.

FAQ

  • How much does it cost to frame an addition?

Framing costs generally range between $9 and $18 a square foot for an addition.

  • Is metal framing cheaper than wood?

No, metal framing costs between $14 and $36 a square foot and $9 to $18 a square foot for wood.​

  • How much does framing cost per linear foot?

Framing is done by the square foot and costs between $9 and $18 a foot for wood.​

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Remodeling Terms Cheat Sheet

Definitions in laymen's terms, cost considerations, pictures and things you need to know.
See full cheat sheet.
glossary term picture Truss 1 Trusses: Structural framework used to support a roof

Cost to frame an addition varies greatly by region (and even by zip code). To get free estimates from local contractors, please indicate yours.

Framing out a new addition to a wooden home

Labor cost by city and zip code

Compared to national average
Alamogordo, NM
-38%
Alexandria, VA
+2%
Alpharetta, GA
+9%
Athens, GA
-9%
Atlanta, GA
+24%
Austin, TX
+13%
Beaverton, OR
+15%
Bothell, WA
-6%
Brandon, FL
-5%
Calhan, CO
-23%
Campton, KY
+25%
Cape Coral, FL
-9%
Chula Vista, CA
+8%
Colorado Springs, CO
-3%
Cranston, RI
+9%
Daphne, AL
-11%
Dayton, OH
-7%
Duluth, MN
-13%
Duncan, OK
-36%
Eatonton, GA
-35%
Edmond, OK
-8%
El Paso, TX
-28%
Escondido, CA
+9%
Everett, WA
-14%
Fishers, IN
+9%
Glenview, IL
+40%
Grand Rapids, MI
+7%
Graysville, AL
+1%
Greenville, SC
-12%
Grimes, IA
0%
Hamilton, OH
-3%
Hoven, SD
-30%
Iselin, NJ
+39%
Jacksonville, FL
-1%
Jamul, CA
+13%
Kingston, PA
-13%
Kissimmee, FL
-20%
Los Angeles, CA
+11%
Marietta, GA
+10%
Mesa, AZ
-2%
Mesquite, TX
+7%
Midland, TX
-15%
Minneapolis, MN
+25%
Monticello, MN
-2%
Orlando, FL
+2%
Pasadena, TX
+16%
Plano, TX
+24%
Poquoson, VA
-5%
Portland, OR
+11%
Redlands, CA
-1%
Labor cost in your zip code
Last modified:   See change history
Methodology and sources