facebook pixel
cost guide icon
 

Build a Storage Shed Cost

Build a Storage Shed Cost

National average
$5,630
(custom-built 10’ x 12’ wood shed with pine siding)
Low: $1,200

(DIY assembly of a resin shed kit)

High: $33,200

(custom-built 20’ x 20’ brick-clad workshop with a metal roof)

Cost to build a storage shed varies greatly by region (and even by zip code).
Get free estimates from garage, shed and enclosure contractors in your city.

The best way of getting your job done

Fixr.com finds the best top rated contractors in your area
The contractors offer competitive quotes for your job
Compare and hire the contractor that will best fit your needs

Build a Storage Shed Cost

National average
$5,630
(custom-built 10’ x 12’ wood shed with pine siding)
Low: $1,200

(DIY assembly of a resin shed kit)

High: $33,200

(custom-built 20’ x 20’ brick-clad workshop with a metal roof)

Cost to build a storage shed varies greatly by region (and even by zip code).
Get free estimates from garage, shed and enclosure contractors in your city.

The average cost of building a storage shed is $5,630​.

How Much Does It Cost to Build a Storage Shed?

Adding a shed to your property provides storage, workspace, and added visual appeal to the area all at once. Sheds come in a wide variety of styles, sizes, and uses. Whether used for gardening or as a workshop, a shed adds a lot of utility to your yard.

Because sheds come in many sizes, styles, and materials and have many different uses, they have an incredibly wide range of associated costs. Sheds can be custom made, built DIY from a purchased plan, or assembled from a kit. The national average cost range is $1,500 to $10,000, with most homeowners paying around $6,000 for a 10’ x 12’ storage shed clad in pine siding with a simple gable roof.

Cost to Build a Shed

Storage Shed Costs
National average cost$6,000
Average range$1,500-$10,000
Minimum cost$1,000
Maximum cost$80,000


What Is a Shed Used For?

Many people use sheds for storage purposes, either for gardening tools or things like bikes, golf carts, and motorcycles. But sheds can have a wide range of purposes, which dictate how large it is, the flooring, and how it is laid out and finished inside.

Typical uses for sheds include:

  • Gardening sheds - These are usually large enough for a potting table and storage of basic gardening equipment.
  • Storage shed - A storage shed can be any size depending on what you plan to keep in it. People use sheds to store lawn mowers, rakes, gardening equipment, bikes, golf carts, sports equipment, and more.
  • Workshop/office - If you want to work in your shed and have a space separate from your home, you need to fully finish, insulate, and wire your shed for electricity. These sheds are more like small houses and have much higher costs to build.
  • Child’s playhouse - A simple shed can also be used as a child’s playhouse. These sheds can be any size and may be finished or unfinished, depending on how you intend your children to use them.

Cost to Build a Shed Per Square Foot

The cost to build a shed has a wide range per square foot, depending on several factors like the materials, purpose, how finished it is, and whether it is a kit, a DIY build from plans, or a custom shed.

The most common cost per square foot for a professionally built shed is around $50 a square foot if the interior will not be finished. If you intend to finish the interior for an office or workshop and need to insulate it and add things like electricity, expect your costs to go as high as $200 a square foot.

Some kits and DIY builds run around $25 a square foot, after purchasing all materials, equipment, and the plans.


Back yard with garden and wooden shed


Shed Cost by Material

Sheds are most commonly built of wood, resin (plastic), or metal. Resin and metal are most commonly found in kits, although some metal sheds can be custom built with a wood frame. However, it is also possible to build custom sheds using concrete and brick, although the material costs become much higher, and they require specialists to build.

Each material has its own cost, pros, and cons. Below are the most common costs associated with each material:

Cost to Build a Shed

Cost to Build a Shed


MaterialAverage Costs for 10’ x 12’ Shed
Resin (plastic)$1,000
Metal$4,500
Wood$6,000
Concrete$18,000
Brick$24,000


Resin Shed Cost

Resin sheds are very low maintenance and can be built from kits. They are fairly durable and lightweight, but sizes, styles, and colors are limited. There is little to no customization, and they are less likely to have floors unless you custom build one, which adds to the cost. Most resin sheds cost around $1,000 to build from a kit.

Metal Shed Cost

Metal sheds can be purchased in a kit, but these are generally flimsy and not recommended for any area that sees high winds or snow because they cannot hold up well enough to either one. A metal shed with a lumber frame with metal walls and roof can be built anywhere. Metal is limited in style and color options, but if you are custom building with a wood frame, you can have your shed built to nearly any size. A wooden-framed metal shed costs around $4,500.

Wooden Shed Cost

Wood sheds are the most common custom-built type. They come in nearly endless styles and variations and can be clad on the exterior with any siding to make them more weather-resistant. They can have concrete or wooden floors and any roofing material. Wooden sheds can be higher in maintenance if you use wooden flooring and siding because they need to be protected from the elements and painted or stained regularly. The average cost of a custom-built wooden shed is around $6,000.

Concrete Shed Cost

Concrete sheds are most often built of concrete blocks and, in some cases, ICF blocks, if you intend to use the shed as a finished office or workroom. They can also be built of poured concrete. They can be customized in numerous ways and can have either plain concrete walls or be clad in various siding and roofing options. They are more expensive to construct and cost around $18,000 on average.

Brick Shed Cost

Brick sheds may be built with a wooden frame and then clad in brick or, in rare instances, be built of nothing but brick with a timber roof. In either case, they can be customized or finished in a wide variety of ways. Brick is expensive to work with, even with a wooden frame, so expect to pay about $24,000 on average.

Metal vs Wood Shed

When comparing metal vs wood, consider combining these materials. A wood frame is more sturdy than a metal frame and less likely to be damaged by wind or snow. But metal walls and roofs are resistant to rot, moisture, insect activity, and flames, making them a longer-lasting option than wood walls.

Plastic vs Wood Shed

Plastic kits are available for small sheds, and they are very durable. However, they are not customizable and are limited in size and style. Wood sheds need more maintenance than plastic sheds, but you can endlessly customize them with size, color, trim, and siding and roofing choices.

Shed Cost by Size

In most instances, the biggest determining factor in the cost of your shed is its size. This is true whether you use a kit, a DIY build from a plan, or a custom build. Below are some of the most common sizes and costs, assuming a professionally built shed.

Storage Shed Costs

Storage Shed Costs


Shed SizeAverage Cost
6’ x 4’ shed (24 sq.ft.)$1,200
6’ x 9’ shed (54 sq.ft.)$2,700
8’ x 8’ shed (64 sq.ft.)$3,200
8’ x 10’ shed (80 sq.ft.)$4,000
8’ x 12’ shed (96 sq.ft.)$4,800
10’ x 8’ shed (80 sq.ft.)$4,000
10’ x 10’ shed (100 sq.ft.)$5,000
10’ x 12’ shed (120 sq.ft.)$6,000
10’ x 16’ shed (160 sq.ft.)$8,000
10’ x 20’ shed (200 sq.ft.)$10,000
12’ x 16’ shed (192 sq.ft.)$9,600
12’ x 24’ shed (288 sq.ft.)$14,400
16’ x 12’ shed (192 sq.ft.)$9,600
16’ x 16’ shed (256 sq.ft.)$12,800
16’ x 20’ shed (320 sq.ft.)$16,000


Square footage is not always the most accurate indicator of cost per size. This is because a shed may be taller or shorter, be a lean-to on an existing structure, have a flat roof, which is less expensive to build, or have a decorative roof.

For example, while a 10’ x 12’ shed costs around $6,000 for a basic structure with a gable roof, it could cost less with a flat roof. Or if you wanted a much taller, two-story shed, it could be the same as the 16’ x 20’ shed cost because you need to add stairs, an extra floor, and more material.

So while these costs serve as a basic guide, your 12’ x 24’ shed costs could be $14,400 or $30,000, depending on how you build, finish, and construct the structure.

Roof Shed Price

All the same materials used for roofing on your home can be used on your shed as well. Many people like to clad their sheds in similar materials to their homes to give their property a more cohesive look. However, to save costs, choose a flat roof for your shed and clad it in less expensive materials. Below are some of the most common materials for roofing a shed and their average cost per square foot.


Shed Roof Materials Chart

Shed Roof Materials Chart


Roof MaterialAverage Cost per Sq.ft.
Tin$1.50 - $2.50
Spray foam$2.00
Bitumen$2.00 - $5.00
Asphalt shingle$2.10
Tile$3.00 - $30.00
Metal$5.00 - $20.00


Labor Cost to Build a Shed

The labor cost to build a shed varies tremendously based on several factors. Most sheds can be built on any clear area of an existing yard, but if you do not have a clear area, you need excavation or clearing first, which adds to the cost. Grading is the most common type of land preparation needed for a shed and costs $4.37 - $5.41 a square foot.

The material type and whether the floor is concrete or wood also impact the labor cost. Most sheds do not have electricity or plumbing run to them, but if you intend to have a workshop or office inside your shed, you need to have at least electricity run to the area, which further increases labor costs.

Having a kit put together by a professional has the lowest labor costs. If a carpenter or builder constructs a new custom shed from plans, your labor costs will be considerably higher.

Because sheds can be built in so many different ways, you may need one or more of the following professionals if you choose not to DIY the project:

On average, the labor costs of building a shed average around $70 an hour, or around half the total cost to build a custom shed - $3,000 for a 10’ x 12’ wooden shed. For a kit, expect to pay a fee of $100 to $500, depending on how complex it is to assemble. When contracting with a shed building company, they supply all the materials and labor and, in many instances, build all or most of the shed off-site, then deliver it to your property for finishing.


Home shed in a pretty residential garden


Shed Plans and Cost

There are additional costs that go into building a shed. If your shed is more than 100 square feet, you will need a permit to build it, which has costs starting at $100. If you intend to work from plans rather than contracting with a shed building company, you need to purchase those as well. Shed plans cost $100 to $1,000, depending on where you purchase them and the plan’s complexity.

How Much Would It Cost to Insulate a Shed?

The vast majority of sheds are uninsulated. The only time you need to insulate a shed is when it will be used as a workplace. Insulation has a wide range of costs, from low-cost fiberglass to ICF blocks. Expect to spend at least $200 on insulating a basic shed. Larger sheds, sheds with living areas above them, and sheds built from ICF blocks have higher costs.

Cost of a She Shed

Many women who need workspaces or garden sheds choose to build what is known as a “she shed.” These have the same costs as any other shed and the same finishes and uses. Some women choose to insulate and finish the sheds to create a more comfortable space. If so, the price is closer to $24,000. If you decide to build a standard she shed, the costs are around $6,000 on average.

Buy or Build a Shed

It is possible to purchase a fully built shed and have it delivered to your home. It is also possible to buy a kit and assemble it yourself or hire a handyman to do so. Or, you can choose to build a shed either yourself or by hiring a carpenter.

Because there are so many options and variables, there is also a wide overlap of costs. It is possible to purchase a small upright resin shed for $500 or a fully custom-built shed that is delivered to your home intact, starting from $30,000. Likewise, you can build one from inexpensive lumber DIY for $500 or hire someone to build a shed for you on your property for $30,000.

When choosing to buy or build a shed, your biggest considerations should be in getting a durable shed that holds up well to your climate and fits your needs. Some people find that a prebuilt resin shed meets their needs perfectly, while others want a custom shed that blends in better with their property and allows them to accommodate overnight guests.

Therefore, the decision to buy or build a shed should not depend on the cost but its intended purpose.


Shed with terrace and wooden garden furniture during spring


Shed vs Barn

Another outdoor structure that many people choose to build if they have the space and need is a barn. Barns are larger than sheds and are better for storing equipment, such as tractors, and housing animals. They often are two stories or contain lofts for additional storage, while sheds are usually one large room, although some sheds can also have a small loft or sleeping area.

Barns usually have a similar cost per square foot as sheds, but because they are much larger - around 1,000 sq.ft. on average - they have higher costs, starting at about $50,000 for a very basic structure.

Best Storage Shed Kits

Storage shed kits can be a good way to get a shed on your property for less. Keep in mind that many kits are made of lightweight material to make shipping less expensive. Lightweight materials may mean that the shed is not as durable and may not last as long as one that is custom-built or even prefabricated. Below are a few recommendations for shed kits.


BEST OVERALL: Rubbermaid 7 x 7-foot Durable Resin Storage Shed



This 7 x 7-foot resin shed from Rubbermaid is durable and weatherproof. It’s the perfect size for storing bikes, lawnmowers or gardening tools. It doesn’t need any finish work, and comes with a wall organizer system for more ways to store your belongings.


BEST VALUE: Best Barns 10’ x 10’ Wood Shed Kit



If you want the look of a miniature barn on your property, consider this kit from Best Barns. The siding is pre-primed and ready for finishing, and all the lumber is precut and ready for assembly. At 100 square feet, you may need a permit for this project.


ALSO CONSIDER: Cypress 10’ x 12’ Wood Storage Shed Kit


This is a very basic but roomy wood shed kit. It is treated to resist fungal decay and comes with a window and barn-style door preassembled. It also includes a durable trim for a finished appearance.


Cost to Turn a Shed into a House

If you have a large enough shed, you could have it completely finished, wired for electricity, and plumbing run to it to create a tiny house. Because most of the costs are in the finishing, this would not be an inexpensive project unless you intend to do it yourself over time. Finishing costs will run around $125 a square foot, plus insulation, running the plumbing and electrical lines, and other interior finishing add even more costs, for a total of up to $250 a square foot. This assumes that you do not add square footage onto the shed because most sheds are only a single room and are not divided into kitchen, sleeping, and bathing areas. These houses are not legal to live in unless they are permitted and inspected, however.

Cost to Move a Shed in a Backyard

If you have an existing shed but want to move it to another location, this could have a range of costs. If your shed does not have a floor, it can be easily moved for around $50 in most cases. If your shed has a concrete pad for a floor, you will need a new floor poured, which has costs of up to $300. Some wood floors can be moved with the rest of the shed.

If your shed is larger than 100 square feet, you will need a permit to move it, which includes marking off the new location and having it checked by the town or municipality before you can move it. This can add further costs of $100.


Garden shed exterior in Spring


Enhancement and Improvement Costs

Shed Flooring

Many sheds have a floor, particularly those used as workshops or potting sheds. Floors can be made of poured concrete, plywood, or plastic. If you purchase a kit, you usually need to build the floor separately, while custom sheds can have them built-in. The cost of a shed floor starts at $100.

Barn Door

Most sheds need wide doors to accommodate equipment and storage. Therefore, a barn door is the most frequently installed style because they are wider than standard doors. Barn door costs start at $100.

Cost to Build a Workshop

Many people use sheds as workshops. Because workshops need things like insulation and electricity, expect to pay closer to $200 a square foot.

Adding a Lean-to to an Existing Shed

If you need more space, add a lean-to to your existing shed. This is more like a bump-out than a full addition. Costs average around $30 a square foot.

Gutter Installation

If your shed has a pitched roof, consider installing gutters to direct the rain from the foundation. Gutter installation starts at around $3 - $5 a foot.

Asbestos Shed Removal Cost

If you have an older shed with masonite siding or older asbestos flooring or insulation, you will not be able to tear this down on your own. You need to call in an asbestos abatement team. The cost of this project largely depends on where the asbestos is located and how much there is. Expect costs to start at $500.

Additional Considerations and Costs

  • While your shed may be for storage, it still has to match the rest of the appearance of your property for the best look and a cohesive design. Try to match certain details, such as siding, roofing, or overall house style, to the shed for the best results.
  • Consider your landscaping and how it will interact with your shed as well. Many people choose to blend it into the yard with garden beds or trellises.
  • Ensure that your doorway is big enough to accommodate your largest piece of equipment easily, such as golf carts or lawn tractors.
  • You can build your shed on wheels. This allows you to move it around the yard if needed. These tend to be much smaller sheds, no more than 15 square feet.
  • The flatter your yard, the less grading that needs to be done, and the lower the project cost. The hillier your property, the higher your total cost.
  • You cannot legally live in a shed. If you choose to make the shed a residence, it must undergo permitting and inspection for that purpose.
  • Sheds are not very tall, which means that the roof will be visible. If possible, match your roof’s pitch, style, and material to your home for the most cohesive look.
  • Old sheds can often be pulled down very easily, usually for a few hundred dollars, or you can do this yourself with a tractor-trailer or a sledgehammer.
  • If you need more than one shed, consider supplementing with a smaller structure. Small sheds can be found in corner, vertical, and horizontal orientations that are as small as 5’ x 4’ x 3’.

FAQs

  • How much does it cost to build a shed per square foot?

A custom-built shed has an average cost of around $50 a square foot.

  • How hard is it to build a shed?

This depends entirely on your comfort level and experience. If you are unsure, consider a kit that has precut and drilled lumber.

  • How much does it cost to build a small workshop?

Workshops need more finish work and electricity than storage sheds, making the cost closer to $200 a square foot.

  • How much does a new 10’ x 16’ barn-style shed cost?

The average cost for a shed this size is around $8,000 if custom built.

  • How much does it cost to move a shed?

Provided it does not have a concrete pad, it should cost around $50 on average.

Was this guide helpful to you?
  

Cost to build a storage shed varies greatly by region (and even by zip code). To get free estimates from local contractors, please indicate yours.

Fenced backyard with wooden walkout deck and small shed

Labor cost by city and zip code

Compared to national average
Anchorage, AK
+35%
Ashland, NH
+22%
Athens, GA
-9%
Atlanta, GA
+24%
Aurora, CO
+10%
Austin, TX
+13%
Bakersfield, CA
-6%
Baltimore, MD
+12%
Bradenton, FL
-8%
Broken Arrow, OK
-17%
Buffalo, NY
-1%
Carrollton, TX
+14%
Charlotte, NC
+6%
Chicago, IL
+40%
Cleveland, OH
+7%
Coldwater, MI
-21%
Colorado Springs, CO
-3%
Dallas, TX
+10%
Dayton, OH
-7%
Denver, CO
+1%
Detroit, MI
+16%
Fort Collins, CO
-11%
Fort Lauderdale, FL
+2%
Fort Worth, TX
+6%
Glendale, CA
+14%
Hartford, CT
+23%
Holly, MI
-4%
Houston, TX
+24%
Huntsville, AL
-17%
Kansas City, MO
+4%
Knoxville, TN
+10%
Lancaster, NY
-1%
Laurel, MT
-12%
Littleton, CO
+2%
Los Angeles, CA
+11%
Memphis, TN
+11%
Miami, FL
+1%
Milwaukee, WI
+12%
Minneapolis, MN
+25%
Murfreesboro, TN
-7%
Norfolk, VA
-6%
Omaha, NE
-10%
Opelousas, LA
-13%
Orlando, FL
+2%
Pensacola, FL
-19%
Phoenix, AZ
0%
Portland, OR
+11%
Reno, NV
0%
Richmond, VA
+4%
Sacramento, CA
+8%
Labor cost in your zip code
Last modified:   See change history
Methodology and sources